The Files That Make Up the 'Other' Storage Category, and How to Remove Them

Category Archives: MAC

Category Archives: MAC

The Other category on Mac storage consists of all the files that don't fit into any of the standard categories, such as Apps, Photos. In the sidebar at the left, ignore Recommendations and look at the rest of the categories, particularly Applications, Documents, and iOS Files. Other is a category mark in macOS' System Information device. It addresses.

Category Archives: MAC - all

Find and delete files on your Mac

  • Applications, Music, TV, Messages, and Books: These categories list files individually. To delete an item, select the file, then click Delete.

    Note: If you delete an item that you got from the iTunes Store, the App Store, or Apple Books using your Apple ID, the item is still in iCloud, and you can download it again.

  • Documents: See all the documents on your Mac. You can quickly view large files or downloads by clicking the corresponding button, and sort files by clicking Name, Kind, Last Accessed, or Size near the top of the window. You can also click File Browser to view the contents and amount of storage used by various folders in your file system.

    Note: Some folders and files that are already represented by categories in the sidebar—other than Documents—are dimmed.

    To delete a file, select it, then click Delete; click Show in Finder to view the file in the Finder.

  • iCloud Drive, Photos, Music Creation, and Mail: These categories provide general recommendations for optimizing storage. To accept the recommendation, click the button.

  • iOS files: See iOS backup and firmware files listed individually. To delete an item, select the file, then click Delete.

  • Trash: Click Empty Trash to erase all the items in the Trash.

  • Источник: [storycall.us]

    What Is Other in Mac Storage And How to Clean It Up

    Between photos, videos, documents, and everything else, even the biggest Mac hard drives tend to fill up deceptively fast. You can shuffle some things off to iCloud, but what about the cryptic Other Storage and "other volumes in container" categories? Here's what Other storage is on Mac and how to clean it up.

    What Is Other in Mac Storage?

    Your Mac conveniently categorizes files into a number of broad containers, including Apps, Photos, Movies, Audio, and Backups. These categories are easy to understand. For example, files included in the Photos section are clearly photo files like JPEGs and PNGs, and your iTunes library probably takes up the lion's share of the Audio category.

    By including the Other category, Apple is able to simplify their storage report and make everything look nice and neat. The issue is the Other category, also referred to as "other volumes in container" depending on your version of macOS, literally contains every file type that doesn't fall into any of the other categories.

    Some of the most common files included in the Other section include:

    • Documents: Word processor documents, proprietary image files like .psd, Adobe Acrobat files, and various other documents all fit into the Other category. Some of these, like proprietary image files, can take up a lot of space.
    • System and temporary files: All of your macOS system files are lumped into this category, along with temporary files that are created by the system or downloaded and used in system updates. Starting with Catalina, most of these files are grouped into the self-explanatory System category.
    • Cache files: When an app like a web browser, or macOS itself, creates a cache file, it gets grouped into the Other category.
    • Archives: If a file or set of files are archived, like .zip and .dmg files, they are grouped in this category. Removing the files from the archive will cause them to show up in the appropriate categories.
    • App plugins: If you download and install a plugin or extension for an app, like a browser plugin, it will be grouped into this category instead of the Apps category.
    • And everything else doesn't fit neatly into the other five categories.

    How to Clean Up Other Storage on a Mac

    Now that you know the sorts of files that get lumped into the Other category in your Mac storage, it should be clear cleaning up that space isn't as simple as flipping a switch. You can target individual file types though, with special attention paid to large and unneeded files, to free a lot of space.

    Here's how to free up some space on your Mac by deleting from the Other category:

    1. Close any open windows, and return to your desktop.

    2. Press Command + F.

    3. Click This Mac if it isn't already selected.

    4. Click the first dropdown menu field and select Other.

    5. From the Search Attributes window, select File Size and File Extension.

    6. Enter a document type like .pdf, .csv, .pages, etc. You can also search for disk images and archives, like .dmg and .zip.

    7. Examine the list of items.

    8. Delete any items you no longer need, or back up items you don't expect to need in the near future.

    9. You can also search for files that are larger than a specified size to identify candidates for deletion.

      Press the + button on the right side of the window to add another search condition, allowing you to search by file type and size at the same time.

    10. Continue this process for various file types until you have freed a satisfactory amount of space.

    How to Clear Cache Files on a Mac

    Cache files can take up a large chunk of your Other category, and they won't show up when you search for old and unwanted files as you learned to do in the previous section. To clear out cache files, you need to navigate to the location where they are stored and delete them.

    Cache files are created all the time during the normal operation of macOS. As soon as you delete your cache files, you'll immediately see new ones start to populate the once-empty space.

    1. Open Finder.

    2. Navigate to Go > Go To Folder.

    3. Type ~/Library/Caches, and click Go.

    4. To prevent any possible issues, drag the Caches folder to your desktop temporarily before deleting anything. If you experience problems, you can simply drag it back and delete one thing at a time.

    5. Select everything in the Caches folder, and move it to the Trash.

    6. All the items from your cache file will be moved into the trash and you can close the file.

    Removing App Extensions on a Mac

    Most of the space occupied by the Other category is taken up by uncategorized files and cache files, which you have already learned to clean up. If you want to squeeze out a little more space, consider removing any application extensions which you no longer use.

    You can free up a lot more space by uninstalling old apps you no longer use, but app data is appropriately held in the Apps category. Extensions and plug-ins, however, are small additions that are lumped into Other as they aren't full apps.

    If you use Safari, you can view and remove any Safari plugins you no longer need to free up some space. Other apps that use extensions and plug-ins have similar processes to allow you to remove the add-ons without removing the base app. For example, Chrome users can navigate to More > More tools > Extensions, click on an extension, and click Remove.

    Thanks for letting us know!

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    Package (macOS)

    In the Apple macOS operating system, a package is a file system directory that is normally displayed to the user by the Finder as if it were a single file. [1] Such a directory may be the top-level of a directory tree of objects stored as files, or it may be other archives of files or objects for various purposes, such as installer packages, or backup archives.

    Definition[edit]

    The package is a common file system abstraction used by Apple operating systems, such as macOS and iOS. It is a directory that may contain a hierarchy of files or objects that represent a preserved, organized state. A package is displayed to users like a single file in the Finder application to avoid being changed by the user. However, the content of packages may be accessed through special keyboard and mouse combination events. For this purpose, the control-click, or right-click, menu displays a directive Show Package Contents.[1]

    Some documents may be represented as packages:[2]

    The Uniform Type Identifier (UTI) for a package is storycall.use.[3]

    Bundles[edit]

    A package that has a standardized structure for storing executable code and its associated resources, is called a bundle.

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    SSDs are great—they’re fast, durable, and reliable—but they’re also expensive, which results in many of us not having as much storage built into our Macs as we’d like. Particularly for those who watch videos in iTunes or take a lot of photos, it’s all too easy to run out of space on your Mac’s internal drive.

    MacPaw’s CleanMyMac X is a great solution for those who don’t mind its $35 price tag. This utility can help you identify and remove unnecessary data to free up space. It can ferret out forgotten downloads, old videos, mammoth folders, bloated caches, outdated iOS updates and backups, copies of iOS apps, and more. It also boasts other features that can improve performance, protect your Mac from malware, and keep your apps up to date.

    But if you want to go the belt-and-suspenders route, you can use Apple’s built-in tool for cleaning house: Storage Management.

    Apple hid Storage Management inside the System Information app, but there’s a shortcut for accessing it. Choose  Apple > About This Mac, click the Storage button, and then click Manage… but wait! Before you click Manage, look at the About This Mac window’s Storage view.

    Storage Management About This Mac x

    Hover over each colored bar to see how much space is taken up by a particular type of data. The white space at the end of the bar shows space that’s still available. You can’t do much here, but the view gives you a quick overview of your usage.

    When you click Manage, System Information launches, and the Storage Management window appears. (You can also open System Information manually and choose Window > Storage Management.) In the sidebar at the left, ignore Recommendations and look at the rest of the categories, particularly Applications, Documents, and iOS Files. The specific categories will vary a bit between Macs, depending on what apps you use, but they correspond to the colored bars you saw in the About This Mac window’s Storage view.

    Applications

    The Applications category lists your apps and is sorted by size by default. But try clicking the column header for Kind and scrolling down. You can probably trash most apps tagged as Duplicates or Older Versions. Similarly, click the Last Accessed column header to see which apps you haven’t launched in years. Many of them can probably go. Plus, you can redownload anything tagged as coming from the App Store, so you can toss those apps to save space.

    Storage Management Applications x

    Documents

    In Documents, you’ll see three buttons: Large Files, Downloads, and File Browser. Large Files focuses on files over 50 MB in size, Downloads displays the contents of your Downloads folder (much of which you likely don’t need), and File Browser gives you a column view that’s sorted by file size and shows sizes next to each item. It’s great for trawling through your drive to see what’s consuming all that space.

    Storage Management Documents x

    In any of these views other than File Browser, hover over any item to see an X button for deleting the file and a magnifying glass button that reveals the file in the Finder. To delete multiple files at once, Command-click or Shift-click to select them and then press the Delete key to remove them all at once. Storage Management gives you the combined size of all the selected files and warns you before deleting the files, so you can use this technique to preview how much space a multi-file deletion will save.

    In File Browser, select one or more files and either drag them to the Trash icon in the Dock, or press Command-Delete.

    iOS Files

    If you’ve used iTunes to manage iOS devices in the past, pay special attention to the iOS Files category. It shows any device backups and software updates that are stored on your Mac’s drive. If you still use iTunes to back up your device, it’s worth keeping the latest backup of devices you still use, but many people have obsolete backups and unnecessary updates kicking around.

    Storage Management iOS Files x

    Other

    As noted before, the rest of the categories here may vary depending on what apps you use. With Books and iTunes, you can remove content that you’ve purchased, since you can download it again. With Mail and Photos, Storage Management merely tells you how much space the app’s data occupies and lets you enable space optimization (downloading only recent attachments for Mail, and keeping only optimized photos on the Mac). To save more space, you must delete unnecessary data from within the app itself.

    If your Mac’s drive is filling up—if it has less than 10 percent free space—consider using the Storage Management tools to search out and delete files that are wasting space. To be safe, make a backup first!


    Social Media: Is your Mac complaining about being low on drive space? Learn how to use the Storage Management window to find and delete gigabytes of old, unnecessary, or obsolete files at:

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    In order to reduce the size of your Inbox, you need to export (manually archive) to an Outlook for Mac Data File (.olm) on your Mac.

    You can still access this data at any time, and you can even transfer individual items, or the entire Data File, to Outlook for Mac on another computer.

    For information on how to import the data from a "Outlook for Mac Data File (.olm)", please refer to "Import email messages, contacts, and other items into Outlook for Mac" for details.

    How to export items:

    When you export to an Outlook for Mac Data File, you can choose to filter information by category or by item type. For example, if you want to transfer networking information from your work computer to your home computer, you could export only items that you've assigned to the Networking category. Similarly, you might want to export all your contacts on your home computer and then import them on your work computer. During the export process, you can choose to keep the exported items in Outlook, or to delete them after they are exported.

    1. On the File menu, click Export.
    2. Click Outlook for Mac Data File.
    3. Select an option to filter by category or item type. (To export all items in Outlook, click Items of the following types, and then select all the check boxes.)
    4. Click the right arrow to continue, and then follow the instructions. (The Outlook for Mac Data File uses the .olm extension.)

    Note:

    • In Outlook for Windows, you can setup "AutoArchive" to archive Outlook items by specific time automatically on a regular interval. This feature is not available on Outlook for Mac, but you can archive data automatically by setting up Time Machine.
    • An Outlook for Mac Data File (.olm) does not contain account settings or your Outlook preferences.
    • For more information, you can refer to "Export items to an archive file in Outlook for Mac"

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    Category Archives: MAC - abstract

    Find and delete files on your Mac

  • Applications, Music, TV, Messages, and Books: These categories list files individually. To delete an item, select the file, then click Delete.

    Note: If you delete an item that you got from the iTunes Store, the App Store, or Apple Books using your Apple ID, the item is still in iCloud, and you can download it again.

  • Documents: See all the documents on your Mac. You can quickly view large files or downloads by clicking the corresponding button, and sort files by clicking Name, Kind, Last Accessed, or Size near the top of the window. You can also click File Browser to view the contents and amount of storage used by various folders in your file system.

    Note: Some folders and files that are already represented by categories in the sidebar—other than Documents—are dimmed.

    To delete a file, select it, then click Delete; click Show in Finder to view the file in the Finder.

  • iCloud Drive, Photos, Music Creation, and Mail: These categories provide general recommendations for optimizing storage. To accept the recommendation, click the button.

  • iOS files: See iOS backup and firmware files listed individually. To delete an item, select the file, then click Delete.

  • Trash: Click Empty Trash to erase all the items in the Trash.

  • Источник: [storycall.us]

    What Is Other in Mac Storage and How Do You Clear It?

    Are you facing a “Your startup disk is full” situation? But you have no more movies or photos that you feel you can send to the trash? Don’t despair! You can free up valuable disk space by cleaning the 'Other' storage on your Mac. Read this article to learn how to delete all the useless files occupying your precious storage.

     

    Let’s take a look at the Mac 'Other' section and optimize your storage.
     

    Tip
     

    Managing your Mac’s disk space usage can be really challenging if you decide to keep track of everything manually.
     

    An alternative way to look after it is with an automatic tool, dedicated to removing unneeded files quickly. That’s where MacKeeper can come in:    

    1. Download and install MacKeeper
    2. Go to the Safe Cleanup tool
    3. Hit Start Scan
    4. Click Clean Junk Files once the scan is complete

    Did you know?

    You can enjoy a one-time cleanup for free, so you can take MacKeeper for a test drive without activating the full version.

    What is 'Other' on Mac storage?

    In a nutshell, the 'Other' storage on a Mac consists of different types of files that don't fall into any particular storage category (like videos, photos, music, apps, or mail). The ‘Other’ category also includes junk files and personal files.

     

    To clarify, it might contain the following file types: .pdf, .psd, .doc, browser caches, voice files, message media files stored locally, system caches, archive files like .zip and .dmg disk images, fonts, extensions, app plugins, and other files that don’t belong to the categories above.

     

    These 'Other' files can occupy a lot of disk space—by cleaning out the 'Other' section on our Mac we were able to recover a whopping 26GB of storage!

    How to check what's taking up 'Other' storage on Mac

    To discover what's taking up space on your hard drive (including in the 'Other' category):

    1. Open the Apple menu
    2. Choose About This Mac
    3. Click Storage
    storage on mac

    Here you'll see an overview of all the available storage on your hard drive, along with the space taken up by various file types. You’ll see a bar divided into several different colored sections, each representing different storage categories. You may need to wait for the system to calculate these sections first.

     

    You'll see how much space is being taken up by apps, photos, videos, system files, etc. Usually, a major part of the used space is taken up by the 'Other' section—often between 10 and 40 percent of your used disk space.

     

    To get more detailed information on what’s taking up your storage, you can use the advanced macOS tools:

     

    1. In the Storage tab click the Manage button

    storage window manage button highlighted

    2. Use the left-hand panel to access any category. First, you'll see the Recommendations window

    recommendations window

    Have a click around to see how you can optimize your storage. It’s an excellent idea to manage your Trash preferences from here. Turning on the Empty Bin Automatically option is a great example of how to free up storage regularly.

    How to delete 'Other' storage on Mac

    Before we take a closer look at the basics of storage management you need to note one crucial thing: starting with macOS Sierra, macOS categorizes files differently to previous versions. So, if you're running the latest macOS Big Sur, it will take a lot less effort from you to clean files in 'Other'.

     

    Important: You can’t delete all files from the 'Other' category.

     

    To clean the 'Other' category, use this method:

    1. Click anywhere on your Desktop
    2. Press Command + F
    3. Select the This Mac tab
    4. Open the first dropdown menu
    5. Choose Other
    6. Look for and tick File Size and File Extension
    7. Click OK
    searching this mac

    8. Next, look for PDFs, Pages, DMG, or CSV files by typing their extensions in the search bar

    searching this mac

    9. Delete anything you don’t need

    Clear temporary files located in 'Other' storage

    What are temporary files? Well, macOS simply can't work without them. The macOS system creates temporary files at the launch of any app to perform various vital processes. However, after the operating system produces these files, they become outdated really quickly. These files aren't deleted automatically—instead, they are moved to the 'Other' category.

     

    We recommend you clean temporary files from the 'Other' section regularly to optimize storage and avoid having to deal with a sluggish Mac. Use the following two methods to do this:

    1. How to find and get rid of temporary files in 'Other' on Mac

    1. Open Finder and select Go > Go to Folder from the menu bar
    2. Type in ~/Library
    3. Look for Application Support
    application support folder

    Application Support is a system folder that contains temporary files. The MobileSync folder, for instance, contains old device backups. Review the details of this folder and delete temporary files that you're sure you don't need anymore.

    2. How to find and clear cache in 'Other' on Mac

    Different types of cache files can waste disk space. Here's how to delete cache files from the 'Other' category manually:

    1. Open Finder and select Go > Go to Folder from the menu bar
    2. Type ~/Library
    3. Find a Caches folder and copy its contents to the desktop for a backup
    library caches folder

    4. Move the original Caches folder to Trash

    5. Empty your Trash bin

    3. How to delete old Time Machine backups

    To delete old backups via Time Machine, do the following:

    1. Connect your backup drive to your Mac
    2. Click on the Time Machine icon in the Menu Bar and choose Enter Time Machine
      Note: if you don't have the Time Machine pinned to the menu bar: go to System PreferencesTime Machine — tick the Show Time Machine in the menu bar box
    Enter Time Machine

    3. Look through your backups and choose the one to delete
    4. Click on the Gear icon in the Finder window
    5. Choose Delete Backup
    6. Confirm the action and enter your admin password

    How to delete downloaded files

    The Downloads folder can easily get cluttered with large files. In particular, the numerous DMG files that are left after an app is installed can, over time, take up a huge amount of available storage space.

     

    Let’s review two methods to remove unneeded downloads:

    1. Open Finder and go to Downloads
    2. Look through the files
    3. Control-click on the documents you don’t need
    4. Choose Move to Bin

     

    Or use the macOS storage management tool:

    1. Click the Apple logo and go to About This Mac
    2. Go to Storage then click the Manage button
    3. Navigate to the Documents section and choose Downloads
    4. Mark the files you don’t need and hit the Delete button
    manage storage with documents tab highlighted

    How to get rid of disk images and archives in 'Other' on Mac

    Disk image file types are stored in 'Other' as well. These files don't belong to the system files. They are downloaded exclusively by users. That's why you need to clear 'Othe’ disk images (DMG files) and archives (ZIP files) manually. To locate these ‘Other’ file types:

    1. In the Finder window type .zip or .dmg in the search bar
    2. Choose Search This Mac
    3. You can also sort the documents by size to quickly find and delete the largest ones

    Delete files in 'Other' automatically

    You can also scan and delete browser extensions by using the Smart Uninstaller tool. You can do it all from one tab, instead of searching through all your web browsers. As an added bonus, you can also review the details of each one of them on the list.

     

    To automatically delete browser extensions using Smart Uninstaller:

    1. Navigate to Smart Uninstaller
    2. Hit Start Scan
    3. Wait for the scan results
    4. Go to Browser Extensions
    5. Tick the extensions you want to remove
    6. Click Remove Selected
    smart uninstaller in mackeeper

    Remove app plugins and app extensions from 'Other' storage on Mac

    App plugins and extensions can be categorized as 'Other' as well. To delete unnecessary extensions, you need to delete them from your web browser. It would be best to do this in each browser you use, although that is rather time-consuming.

    1. Open your browser
    2. Find the extension, plugin, or tab panel, or open Tools
    3. Choose the add-ons that you don't use anymore and remove them

    Delete iTunes device backups

    Device backups are files that also fall under the 'Other' category. If you’ve recently changed to a new iOS device, you might try removing iTunes device backups of your old iPhone or iPad. You’ll be surprised how much storage space can be taken up by such files.

    Get rid of everything else from 'Other' on Mac

    In addition to all the previous steps, you can also remove screensavers from the 'Other' section. They don’t usually take up that much space, but every bit helps.

    To delete screensavers:

    1. Open Finder and select Go > Go to Folder
    2. Type in ~/Library/Screen Savers
    3. Hit Go
    4. Select any screensavers you don’t want and move them to the Trash

     

    Hopefully, you’ve now learned a whole lot more about how to get back extra storage on your Mac. Although you can clean all of these files manually, it’s often fiddly and time-consuming. Cleaning software can automate the process, and the best cleaners for Mac can do it in just a few clicks. Getting one can save you a significant amount of time and protect you from removing items that you still need on your hard drive, like system files.

     

    Read more guides:

    Written By

    Ruslana Lishchuk

    With over 5 years of supporting Mac users, Ruslana lives and breathes everything Mac. Tech expert, Apple lover, and well, a cutie. Say hi on LinkedIn!

    With over 5 years of supporting Mac users, Ruslana lives and breathes everything Mac. Tech expert, Apple lover, and well, a cutie. Say hi on LinkedIn!

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    Forget Folders: The Best Ways to Organize Your Files with Tags and Labels

    Trying to find old files is like trying to go back in time and read your own mind. Where would I have saved those pictures from Australia?!? you think, before spending a frustrating half hour digging through folders and folders of miscellaneous images. What would I have called that report I wrote in August ?!?

    Spend less time in your cloud storage app

    Keep your files and folders organized with automation.

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    Tags (or labels in some apps) can eliminate these exasperating and time-consuming mental exercises. With a couple of tags, you can instantly categorize and label files for hassle-free searches down the road, and then find all of those files again easily no matter where you save them.

    Let's explore why tagging is so useful, and how to set up your own tag system. Then, we’ll dive into how to tag your emails, photos, notes, and files, and glance at the benefits of using tags alongside folders.



    Intro to Tagging

    Tags

    Tags are keywords you assign to files. Think of them like characteristics for a person: Just like you’d describe someone as "tall," "funny," "brunette," and so on, you’d tag a file "important," "tax info," "just for fun," or "work."

    But why use tags, when you could just use folders?

    A file can only be in one folder at a time—but it could have an unlimited number of tags. Say you've made a project brief for a client and you want to save it in the specific project folder and to the client’s main folder. With folders, you'd have to pick one folder or duplicate the file, which could cause issues. Tags, on the other hand, are perfect for adding category data like this, since you can add as many tags as you want to a file. You could tag the document with both the project’s name and the client’s name, then save the file just in the project's folder.

    Tags are the simplest way to add data to files without dealing with endless layers of folders. They're perhaps your most flexible tool for organizing your files.

    Related: Folders are still essential, however. Here's how to best organize your files and folders.

    Tagging Best Practices

    Of course, the flexibility and unlimited nature of tags can be dangerous. It’s easy to spend fifteen extra minutes adding a ton of tags every time you save a new file—and it’s also easy to create so many different tags that you completely forget which ones you’ve used.

    How to Establish a Tag System

    Luckily, you can avoid these issues by establishing a system. Your first step: Figure out your high-level tags. These types of tags divide your content into the most general categories possible, which usually means by type. Examples:

    • A bookstore creates separate spaces for books depending on their genre: mystery, romance, historical fiction, and so on.

    • If you’re making a tag system for your spreadsheets, your high-level tags might be "budget," "schedule," "estimate," "invoice," and "Gantt charts."

    • if you're building a system for documents, you could add tags for "reports," "blog posts," "letters," and so forth.

    Also consider making tags for the status of your files. I tag (or label) my emails as "Answer," "Done," "Pending," and "Ignore," for example. Being able to sort my inbox into these categories helps me stay on top of things.

    Make Your Tags Consistent

    Strive for consistency with your tags. For instance, will you use singular or plural terms ("report" versus "reports"?) Which word type will you use: nouns, adjectives, verbs, or a combination of the three? Are you going to capitalize tags or leave them lowercase? Will you incorporate symbols and characters? The more standardized your system is, the easier it’ll be to find files.

    As a rule of thumb, keep your tags to two words or less. If you find yourself going over that limit, it may make more sense to create two separate tags—for example, rather than tagging something as "Q1 expense report," you could tag it as "Q1" and "expense report."

    Once you’ve come up with plus tags, it’s a good idea to create a master list. I use an Evernote note to keep track of all my tags. This list helps jog my memory if I ever forget a tag; plus, I can periodically look it over to find and delete tags I didn’t end up needing.

    Use Tags with Folders

    Ultimately, the researchers concluded the best system involves folders *and* tags. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

    Not everyone is a fan of using tags. Tiago Forte, founder of productivity training firm Forte Labs, explains, "When you rely heavily on tags, you have to perfectly recall every single tag you’ve ever used, and exactly how it is spelled and punctuated."

    Plus, Forte says, it’s much easier to remember things with physical locations. That’s why you have to concentrate on memorizing a single phone number, but you can immediately recall where you left hundreds of items in your home.

    "Tags force us to think about our notes in a completely abstract way," he argues. Folders, on the other hand, let us "place" our notes in a single physical location.

    Forte definitely has a point. It can be time-consuming to tag every file—especially if you can’t remember those tags when you need them. If you’re producing a relatively small amount of work, using tags might not be productive.

    However, there’s also a case to be made for a folder and tag system.

    Four researchers from the University of Washington studied the comparative benefits folders and tags. According to their research, it’s easier to find files using labels rather than folders. Plus, picking out the right folder can take more work than choosing tags, because you have to select the "right" one. However, because folders let you visually put away your work, they make you feel more organized.

    Ultimately, the researchers concluded the best system involves folders and tags. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

    And great news: we’ve got a comprehensive guide to organizing your files and folders.


    Now that you've got a tag system, let's put it to work. Here's how you can organize your email, photos, notes, and files with tags.

    Tag Your Email Messages

    We receive a lot of email each day—too much, in fact. With so many messages flowing in and out of your inbox, being able to quickly organize them with tags could make the difference between order and chaos.

    Gmail introduced labels (which are tags) to email when it first launched in , and today it's still the leader in tagging emails. Here's how to use its tag tools to sort your messages.

    How to Label Emails in Gmail (Web, iOS, Android)

    Gmail

    To use labels in Gmail, you’ll have to manually tag each email or take a bit more time to create filters to add them. You can find the Labels option by clicking the gear icon, choosing "Settings," and navigating to the "Labels" tab.

    Scroll down to the bottom and select "Create new label." You can choose when the label shows up in your label list and inbox. If you have more than five labels, I recommend using the "show if unread" feature so they only show up when you have unopened emails.

    Gmail also lets you color-code labels for a way to identify them at a glance. Find your label in the sidebar, hover over it, and then click the small three-dot icon next to its name. Then select choose "Label color." You can choose from pre-existing colors, or even create your own.

    Tip: Learn how to get the most out of Gmail's labels—and add them to emails automatically with filters—in Zapier's Gmail Guide.

    Of course, other email programs also offer tagging or labeling options. In Microsoft Outlook, for example, common tags—called Categories—are already set up for you, but you can edit them, create new ones, and color-code them too.

    Tag Your Photos

    Finding a specific picture can take forever. First, you have to remember where you saved it on your computer. Then, you have to dig through thousands of photos before finding the one you were looking for. Unless you name each photo, you can’t look up the title of a photo the same way you’d type in the name of a spreadsheet or presentation, so manually combing through your archives is typically your best option.

    Tags make finding photos far speedier. Just tag each with its location, subject, date, and the people in it, and you’ll have four different ways to locate it. Creating your own tags will give you even more options.

    You'll find tags in advanced photo management tools like Lightroom, but here are some simpler apps to help organize your photo library.

    Pixave (Mac)

    Pixave

    When you save multiple photos, you probably want to apply one or more tags to all of them. For instance, if you import 30 pictures from your last family reunion, you’d tag all 30 with "family reunion," the location, and the date. Pixave makes it easy to add multiple tags to multiple images at once. With its drag and drop tagging, you can simply highlight the relevant tags and place them on the matching pictures.

    When you’re exporting images, the app saves their tags as keywords in their metadata. That means you won’t have to go through the hard work of re-labeling images once you’ve moved them to another platform.

    And Pixave also automatically import images from a designated folder and apply tags for you. Talk about convenience!

    Price: $

    Google Photos (Web, iOS, Android)

    Google Photos

    Technically, Google Photos is the anti-tagging tool. There’s no way to add tags within the app—the closest you can get is adding labels to people’s faces (e.g. "Daniel" or "Aja").

    But Google Photos has such a powerful search, you'll feel like you've already added tags to every photo. It uses Google's AI to identify objects in your photos, so you can search for "watermelon" or "water sports" and find photos containing either in seconds.

    It's magical—and if every app's search worked this well, you wouldn't need tags nearly as much.

    Price: Free

    Tip: The latest version of Apple Photos includes similar features, identifying locations and common objects in the photos on your iPhone, iPad, and macOS.

    Tag Your Notes

    You probably take notes all day long: in the morning, when you think of a random idea; on the subway, when you jot down a question; at your desk, when you write down your goals for the next day, and so on. Recording your miscellaneous thoughts is helpful—but only if you can find them again later.

    Tags give you the power to organize a vast web of interconnected ideas, where saving notes in individual notebooks just won't cut it. Here's how to organize your notes with tags.

    Evernote (Web, macOS, PC, iOS, Android)

    Evernote clipper

    This notebook app wants to be your digital memory, housing everything from simple checklists and detailed checklists to images, PDFs, documents, and more. Of course, the more content you collect, the more important tags become.

    Evernote makes adding tags a cinch. If you use the app’s web extension, you can tag files while you save them. To tag a current note within the app, click the small "tag" icon next to the name of its notebook.

    It’s also easy to browse your notes by tag. On the left menu sidebar, click on "Tags" to see all of your tags.

    Evernote also lets you create nested tags, something you don't usually find with tags in other apps. For example, engineer Thomas Honeyman created a parent tag for "Projects" with three child tags: "Artistic projects," "Business projects," and "School projects."

    To create your own tag hierarchy, open up the "Tags" page, then drag and drop the sub-tag onto the main one.

    Tags appear alphabetically by default. If you want, say, "Work task" to appear before "Grocery list," use a hashtag, period, or symbol. The tags with non-alphanumeric symbols will show up last.

    Price: Free Basic plan for standard features for 2 devices and up to 60MB uploads per month; from $/month Premium plan for unlimited devices, 10GB monthly uploads, and features like offline notebook access; $/user/month for Evernote Business

    For a deeper look at Evernote features and pricing plans, check out ourEvernote review.

    See Evernote integrations on Zapier

    Learn more about Evernote with our roundup of 30 Evernote Tips and Tricks.

    OneNote (Web, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android)

    OneNote

    Looking for a way to tag specific sections of your notes, rather than the entire document? OneNote lets you do just that—and a lot more. Its searchable tags make it easy to pull up every related snippet of your work. For example, you can tag one part of your note with the "idea" tag and another as a "to do."

    When you search OneNote for a tag, the Tag Summary page will show you all the related notes and give you the option of grouping tags, too.

    Price: Free

    Tag Your Files

    The latest versions of macOS and Windows make it easy to add tags to almost anything.

    Mac

    Tagging on the Mac

    Thanks to macOS' tagging feature, you can find any file on your Mac in just three steps. Step one: press command + space to open Spotlight. Step two: enter your tag (or tags). Step three: look through the results to find the right file.

    But before you can become a master of the quick search, you’ll need to actually tag your files. It’s easy to add tags while saving a file: Just choose the relevant ones from the drop-down menu underneath the file’s name or type a new tag to add it to the list.

    If you want to tag a file you’ve already saved, find it in your Finder window, right-click, and select "Tags." You’ll be able to add existing tags or create new ones.

    By default, the built-in color tags show up in your Sidebar menu. However, you’ll probably want to customize this section so it displays your most important or frequently used tags. To do so, open Finder, click "Preferences," and select "Tags," then drag-and-drop the tags into the order you want. You can also change each tag’s color.

    Windows

    Tags in Windows

    Windows users can harness the power of tags as well. When you’re saving specific file types (including Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, Powerpoints, photos, videos, and new folders) you can add tags using the "Tags" field.

    Looking to label a file you’ve already saved? Click on it to open its details, then you should see the option to type new tags under the "Date created" field.

    For the majority of people, these options will be enough. But if you want to tag non-supported file types, like plain text (.txt) or rich text format (.rtf) files, upgrade to a third-party tagging app.

    Price: Free

    The Best Apps to Tag Your Files

    Not content with your computer’s built-in file management system? Luckily, there are plenty of third-party apps to choose from. These options all make it simple to add, edit, and find tags.

    TagSpaces (Web, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android, Linux)

    TagSpaces

    Most of us take a squirrel-like approach to our files, saving some in Dropbox, some on our computer, some in Google Drive, some in Evernote, and so forth. That means it’s tricky to find files even with tags—after all, before you can search "resume" and "marketing jobs," you have to first remember where you saved all your resume drafts.

    That's where TagSpaces comes in. This free app provides cross-platform file tagging and finding, so that you can organize everything the same way regardless of where it’s saved. In other words, if you type "resume" and "marketing jobs" into TagSpaces, it’ll search through every file you’ve ever saved to find the ones with those tags.

    However, that’s not the only reason to download TagSpaces. It also lets you bulk tag files, which is handy when you’re downloading, say, photos from your hackathon, or the presentations from a conference. Even better, you can create tag groups. To give you an idea, you could make a "sales team" tag group containing tags for each individual sales rep.

    Smart tags are also handy. These automatic, time-sensitive tags let you quickly find files by when you saved them; for instance, if you wanted to locate a document you’d saved this morning, you’d search with the "today" tag.

    Price: Free

    Tabbles (Windows)

    Tabbles

    Visual thinkers, rejoice: Tabbles was designed with you in mind. Every tag is represented by a colorful bubble called a "tabble." When you want to place a file into a tabble, you simply drag-and-drop it. That might sound a bit like putting a file into a folder, but files can belong to an unlimited number of tabbles at once.

    What if you’re putting the same types of files into the same tabbles over and over again? Rather than doing unnecessary work, set up tagging rules. You can define which tabbles new files are housed in based on their name, file type, content, or some combination of the above. As an example, imagine you want every Powerpoint file with "winter conference" in its name to be saved to the "Winter Conference" and "Work Presentations" tabbles.

    Tabbles is free for up to 5, files. Paid options offeryou can save an unlimited number of files; plus, you can integrate with cloud sync servers and share your tags with your coworkers.

    Price: Free for up to 5, files; from €1,5/month for paid options, which include more files, tag sharing, and syncing tags across multiple devices

    Turn Tags into Actions

    Does the thought of going through and tagging each and every file in your digital archives sound overwhelming? It did to me—so I decided to start fresh. Every new file I save gets tagged, but I don’t worry about the old ones. I’d definitely recommend this strategy if you’ve already got a full library of files and not enough time to categorize them all.

    If you want to take your tagging to the next level, create a workflow that sends information you tag in one app to another with Zapier, an app integration tool. You can automatically send messages from Gmail with a specific tag (label) to a new card in Trello, for example, or create notes with a specific tag in Evernote from one of your other favorite apps.

    Here are some ideas to help get you started turning tags into actions:

    Organize Emails and Contacts

    Save Tagged Articles

    Share Tagged Posts


    Happy tagging!

    This post was originally published in August and updated for current app info and other details.

    Title image by Metaphox via Flickr. Tags photo by Gustavo da Cunha Pimenta.

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    An online archive—also called an archive mailbox—is a place where you can store old email messages so they don't take up space in your primary mailbox. Your IT or Microsoft admin creates the archive mailbox for you.

    Note: In order for your archive mailbox to work with Outlook for Mac both your archive and primary mailboxes must be either on an Exchange Server (on-premises) or on Exchange Online in Microsoft (cloud). If your primary mailbox is in on Exchange Server, for example, and your archive account is in Exchange Online in Microsoft , you won't be able to use your online archive. Talk to your IT or Microsoft admin about co-locating them.

    Best practices for moving your mail to the archive

    Although you can move individual messages from Outlook for Mac to your archive mailbox one by one (you can't move or copy multiple items at once), the more efficient way to make sure your messages get archived is to use Outlook Web App archive and retention policies.

    Archive and retention policies are set by your IT or Microsoft administrator. Archive policies control how long messages are left in an email folder before they're moved to an archive; retention policies control how long your messages will be saved. Although admins set policies for the entire organization, you can override the policies to suit your needs. See Retention and archive policies in Outlook Web App for instructions.

    If you want to archive multiple messages at one time, and no archive or retention policies are in place, use Outlook Web App to move the messages from your primary mailbox to the archive. You won't be able to move folders but can move all the messages in a folder at once.

    1. Check the box next to all the messages you want to archive.

    2. Drag them to the folder in the navigation pane labeled Personal Archive - <your name>.

      alternate text

      Note: If folders, calendar items, contacts, tasks, or notes were moved to your archive in any other version of Outlook, such as Outlook for Windows, you won't be able to move them or view them in the archive mailbox using Outlook for Mac.

    Additional tips

    • To search within the archive, select an archive folder in the folder pane. You can’t search your mailbox and archives simultaneously.

    • You can create inbox rules to automatically file messages into folders, assign messages to categories, or redirect messages to another account. These rules don't carry over to your archive mailbox, however, and you can't redirect messages to your archive using an inbox rule.

    See Also

    Add an email account to Outlook

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    In order to reduce the size of your Inbox, you need to export (manually archive) to an Outlook for Mac Data File (.olm) on your Mac.

    You can still access this data at any time, and you can even transfer individual items, or the entire Data File, to Outlook for Mac on another computer.

    For information on how to import the data from a "Outlook for Mac Data File (.olm)", please refer to "Import email messages, contacts, and other items into Outlook for Mac" for details.

    How to export items:

    When you export to an Outlook for Mac Data File, you can choose to filter information by category or by item type. For example, if you want to transfer networking information from your work computer to your home computer, you could export only items that you've assigned to the Networking category. Similarly, you might want to export all your contacts on your home computer and then import them on your work computer. During the export process, you can choose to keep the exported items in Outlook, or to delete them after they are exported.

    1. On the File menu, click Export.
    2. Click Outlook for Mac Data File.
    3. Select an option to filter by category or item type. (To export all items in Outlook, click Items of the following types, and then select all the check boxes.)
    4. Click the right arrow to continue, and then follow the instructions. (The Outlook for Mac Data File uses the .olm extension.)

    Note:

    • In Outlook for Windows, you can setup "AutoArchive" to archive Outlook items by specific time automatically on a regular interval. This feature is not available on Outlook for Mac, but you can archive data automatically by setting up Time Machine.
    • An Outlook for Mac Data File (.olm) does not contain account settings or your Outlook preferences.
    • For more information, you can refer to "Export items to an archive file in Outlook for Mac"

    Источник: [storycall.us]
    Category Archives: MAC

    The Files That Make Up the &#;Other&#; Storage Category, Category Archives: MAC, and How to Remove Them

    One of the niceties in the Mac OS is the ability of the system to display how your storage space is being used. Originally introduced in OS X Lion as part of a feature upgrade to the System Information app, the Storage tab displays how much free space is available on each disk attached to your Mac, as well as how a disk&#;s storage is being used, by category.

    If you&#;re not sure how to find the categories, click the Apple logo in the menu bar in the Finder, select About This Mac from the dropdown menu, and then click the Storage tab. Mouse over a color bar, and a text balloon will pop up, telling you what the category is and how Category Archives: MAC disk space it&#;s using.

    The categories change as new versions of the OS are released, but the current categories include System files, Documents, Apps, Category Archives: MAC, iTunes, Backups, Other, Audio, Music Creation, Photos, Category Archives: MAC, Movies, and Purgeable space.

    Purgeable space is more or less unique to the Mac; you can find out more about it in the Rocket Yard Guide: What is Purgeable Space in macOS? The next category that seems to get a lot of attention is Other. So, just what is included in Other?

    That&#;s a common question, one you may often ask yourself, especially when you need to free up space Category Archives: MAC your drive starts to fill up. Category Archives: MAC that happens, I think most of us tend to look at the Other category and think, there&#;s a lot of space being used by Other. If I don’t know what it is, Category Archives: MAC, and the system doesn&#;t seem to know either, then why can’t I just delete those files?

    What&#;s in the Other Category
    The type of files the operating system assigns to the Other category in the Storage display changes a bit from OS version to OS version, but there was a big shakeup in storage management when Apple introduced macOS Sierra, which caused the Other category to Category Archives: MAC better defined.

    Because of the changes, we&#;re going to provide two lists for the type of files that are assigned to Category Archives: MAC Other category: pre macOS (OS X) and post macOS.

    Other File Types in OS X
    The Other category in OS X was a catchall; it included the following:

    • PDF, doc, and PSD documents and files; essentially most document types that weren&#;t stored within the Documents folder in a user&#;s home folder.
    • Disk images, archives, and compressed files, including zip, dmg, pkg, and iso.
    • Files located in the System folder that weren&#;t installed with the system. This could include most temporary files, swap files, even voice files you added to personalize your Mac&#;s speaking voice.
    • User installed items, such as screen savers, wallpaper, most iCloud support files, and Application Support files added along with app installations.
    • Both user and system caches, browser caches, and other cache files created by various apps.
    • App plug-ins, app extensions, and app add-ons; this includes all browser add-ons.
    • Any file type not recognized by Spotlight. This includes Boot Camp files, Windows partitions and files, and virtual machine files.

    The above list gives you an idea of what may be in the Other category under OS X, and why the Other category tended to be quite large sometimes.

    Other File Types in macOS
    When macOS was introduced, the Other category, along with the entire Storage system, received a bit of a makeover. Apple went through how files were allocated to categories, and moved many of the former Other files to more appropriate categories, Category Archives: MAC. This change was mostly made to accommodate the new Store in iCloud and Optimize Storage features that allowed infrequently used files to be moved to the cloud automatically and free up local space.

    The Other category is now used for:

    • Web browser caches and most caches created by apps.
    • Apple Music streams.
    • Photos previews.
    • Most items in the Downloads folder, including installer packages.
    • iOS device backups.

    How to View the Amount of Storage Space Taken Up by Other
    From the Apple menu, select About This Mac.

    OS X Mavericks and earlier: Click the More Info button, and then select the Storage tab.

    OS X Yosemite and later: Click the Storage tab.

    A stacked bar graph will be displayed for each disk attached to your Mac. It may take a few moments for the bar graph to fill in. When complete, the graph will show how each disk&#;s storage is being used, broken down by category, including the Other category.

    Removing Other Files
    Chances are most of the space reported under Other is going to be coming from cache and temporary files, downloaded files, and iOS device backups. We&#;re going to concentrate on those three types, and show you how to remove their unwanted files.

    Cache and Temporary Files: The Rocket Yard has a great guide to finding and removing cache and temp files, so we&#;re going to direct you to: Tech How to Clear Cache and Temp Files from Mac OS.

    Downloaded Files: Some of us tend to download a lot of files. For me, it comes from trying out a lot of different apps. Most of the time, I don’t find the apps that useful and end up deleting them from the /Applications folder. But too many times, the installer package gets left behind in the Downloads folder. To delete the installers, or any other files you&#;ve downloaded and forgotten about, follow these steps:

    Open a Finder window and select Downloads from the sidebar, or select Downloads from the Finder&#;s Go menu.

    Examine the list of files and folders in the Downloads folder. To help you decide which files should be deleted, you can select the Size column to organize the list by the size of the files. This makes it easy to find the largest files that may be impacting your storage space.

    When you find a file you wish to remove, right-click (or control-click) on the file and select Move to Trash from the popup menu. You can also drag the file directly to the trash.

    Don’t forget to empty the trash to permanently remove the files from your Mac and free up disk space.

    The Mac offers another method for removing downloaded files using the Reduce Clutter feature in the Manage Storage tool; we&#;ll cover that option below.

    Device Backups: If you&#;re using an iOS device, Category Archives: MAC, chances are you have multiple backups of the device stored within your iTunes app. Device backups can be a big part of the Other category, depending on how many different devices you have backed up.

    Launch iTunes, and select Preferences from the iTunes menu.

    Select the Devices button in the Preferences windows toolbar.

    Select the device backups you wish to delete from the list. It&#;s a good idea not to delete the most recent backup, unless the device has also been backed up to your iCloud account.

    Make your selection(s), and then click the Delete Backup button.

    Reduce Clutter
    The Mac has a number of storage tools you can use Category Archives: MAC help manage your storage space. One of these is the Reduce Clutter tool, which can help you find, view, and delete files. To access the Reduce Clutter tool, perform the following steps:

    Open the Storage view as outlined above, under the heading: How to View the Amount of Storage Space Taken Up by Other.

    In the System Information window, make sure the Storage tab is selected, and then click the Manage button.

    In the window that opens, select Recommendations, which can be found at the top of the sidebar.

    Recommendations will reveal a number of options, including Store in iCloud, Optimize Storage, Empty Trash Automatically, and the option we&#;re interested in, Reduce Clutter.

    Click the Review Files button in the Reduce Clutter section.

    Select the Documents item in the sidebar.

    There are three filters you can apply to help you in finding files to remove: Large Files, Downloads, and File Browser.

    Large Files: This filter shows files on your Mac organized with the largest files displayed first, a pretty good way to make big changes to how much space is being taken up on your disk.

    Downloads: This will display files in your Downloads folder. The files are organized in the Category Archives: MAC in groups: Older than 1 year, Older than 6 months, Older than 3 months, and Recent. Within each group, files are presented from largest to smallest.

    File Browser: This sets up the display of files similar to how the Finder shows files in Column View mode. Files are organized by size, with the largest appearing on top.

    When in the Large Files or Downloads view, you can examine a file or move it to the trash by hovering over the file name. After a moment, two small icons will be displayed: an X, which when clicked will move the selected file to the trash, and a magnifying glass, which when clicked will open a Finder window with the selected file highlighted. When in File Browser mode, right-clicking on a file will produce a popup menu with a single option, to move the file to the trash

    Although the Reduce Clutter feature doesn&#;t offer an automatic method of removing unused or unwanted files, its filtering system lets you quickly discover the files that are taking up the most space; it also provides a convenient way to remove them.

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    What Is Other in Mac Storage And How to Clean It Up

    Between photos, videos, documents, Category Archives: MAC, and everything else, even the biggest Mac hard drives tend to fill up deceptively fast. You can shuffle some things off to iCloud, but what about the cryptic Other Storage and "other volumes in container" categories? Here's what Other storage is on Mac and how to clean it up, Category Archives: MAC.

    What Is Other in Mac Storage?

    Your Mac conveniently categorizes files into a number of broad containers, including Apps, Photos, Movies, Audio, and Backups. These categories are easy to understand. For example, files included in the Photos section are clearly photo files like JPEGs and PNGs, and your iTunes library probably takes up the lion's share of the Audio category.

    By including the Other category, Apple is able to simplify their storage report and make everything look nice and neat. The issue is the Other category, Category Archives: MAC, also referred to as "other volumes in container" depending on your version of macOS, literally contains every file type that doesn't fall into any of the other categories.

    Some of the most common files included in the Other section include:

    • Documents: Word processor documents, proprietary image files like .psd, Category Archives: MAC, Adobe Acrobat files, and various other documents all fit into the Other category. Some of these, like Category Archives: MAC image files, can take up a lot of space.
    • System and temporary files: All of your macOS system files are lumped into this category, along with temporary files that are created by the system or downloaded and used in system updates. Starting with Category Archives: MAC, most of these files are grouped into the self-explanatory System category.
    • Cache files: When an app like a web browser, or macOS itself, creates a cache file, it gets grouped into the Other category.
    • Archives: If a file or set of files are archived, like .zip and .dmg files, they are grouped in this category. Removing the files from the archive will cause them to show up in the appropriate categories.
    • App plugins: If you download and install a plugin or extension for an app, like a browser plugin, it will be grouped into this category instead of the Apps category.
    • And everything else doesn't fit neatly into the other five categories.

    How to Clean Up Other Storage on a Mac Category Archives: MAC Now that you know the sorts of files that get lumped into the Other category in your Mac storage, it should be clear cleaning up that space isn't as simple as flipping a switch. You can target individual file types though, with special attention paid to large and unneeded files, to free a lot of space.

    Here's how to free up some space on your Mac by deleting from the Other category:

    1. Close any open windows, and return to your desktop.

    2. Press Command + F.

    3. Click This Mac if it isn't already selected.

    4. Click the first dropdown menu field and select Other.

    5. From the Search Attributes window, select Category Archives: MAC Size and File Extension.

    6. Enter a document type like .pdf, Category Archives: MAC. csv. pages, etc. You can also search for disk images and archives, like .dmg and .zip.

    7. Examine the list of items.

    8. Delete any items you no longer need, Category Archives: MAC, or back up items you don't expect to need in the near future.

    9. You can also search for files that are larger than a specified size to identify candidates for deletion.

      Press the + button on the right side of the window to add another search condition, allowing you to search by file type and size at the same time.

    10. Continue this process for various file types until you have freed a satisfactory amount of space.

    How to Clear Cache Files on a Mac

    Cache files can take up a large chunk of your Other category, and they won't show up when you search for old and unwanted files as you learned to do in the previous section. To clear out cache files, you need to navigate to the location where they are stored and delete them.

    Cache files are created all the time during the normal operation of macOS. As soon xfer serum demo Archives you delete your cache files, Category Archives: MAC, you'll immediately see new ones start to populate the once-empty space.

    1. Open Finder.

    2. Navigate to Go > Go To Folder.

    3. Type ~/Library/Caches, and click Go.

    4. To prevent any possible issues, drag the Caches folder to your desktop temporarily before deleting anything. If you experience problems, you can simply drag it back and delete one thing at a time.

    5. Select everything in the Caches folder, and move it to the Trash.

    6. All the items from your cache file will be moved into the trash and you can close the file.

    Removing App Extensions on a Mac

    Most of the space occupied by the Other category is taken up by uncategorized files and cache files, which you have already learned to clean up. If you want to squeeze out a little more space, consider removing any application extensions which you no longer use.

    You can free up a lot more space by uninstalling old apps you no longer use, but app data is appropriately held in the Apps category. Extensions and plug-ins, however, are small additions Category Archives: MAC are lumped into Other as they aren't full apps.

    If you use Safari, you can view and remove any Safari plugins you no longer need to free up some space. Other apps that use extensions and plug-ins have similar processes to allow you to remove the add-ons without removing the base app. For example, Chrome users can navigate to More > More tools > Extensions, click on an extension, and click Remove.

    Thanks for letting us know!

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    An online archive—also called an archive mailbox—is a place where you can store old email messages so they don't take up space in your Category Archives: MAC mailbox. Your IT or Microsoft admin creates the archive mailbox for you.

    Note: In order for your archive mailbox to work with Outlook for Mac both your archive and primary mailboxes must be either on an Exchange Server (on-premises) or Category Archives: MAC Exchange Online in Microsoft (cloud). If your primary mailbox is in on Exchange Server, for example, and your archive account is in Exchange Online in Microsoftyou won't be able to use your online archive, Category Archives: MAC. Talk to your IT or Microsoft admin about co-locating them.

    Best practices for moving your mail to the archive

    Although you can move individual messages from Outlook for Mac to your archive mailbox one by one (you can't move or copy multiple items at once), the more efficient way to make sure your messages get archived is to use Outlook Web App archive and retention policies.

    Archive and retention policies are set by your IT or Microsoft administrator. Archive policies control how long messages are left in an email folder before they're moved to an archive; retention policies control how long your messages will be saved. Although admins set policies for the entire organization, Category Archives: MAC, you can override the policies to suit your needs. See Retention and archive policies in Outlook Web App for instructions.

    If you want to archive multiple messages at one time, and no archive or retention policies are in place, use Outlook Web App Category Archives: MAC move the messages from your primary mailbox to the archive. You won't be able to move folders but can move all the messages in a folder at once.

    1. Check the box next to all the messages you want to archive.

    2. Drag them to the folder in the navigation pane labeled Personal Archive - <your name>.

      alternate text

      Note: If folders, calendar items, contacts, tasks, or notes were moved to your archive in any other version of Outlook, such as Outlook for Windows, you won't be able to move them or view them in the archive mailbox using Outlook for Mac.

    Additional tips

    • To search within the archive, select an archive folder in the folder pane. You can’t search your mailbox and archives simultaneously.

    • You can create inbox rules to automatically file messages into folders, assign messages to categories, or redirect Category Archives: MAC to another account. These rules don't carry over to your archive mailbox, however, and you can't redirect messages to your archive using an inbox rule.

    See Also

    Add an email account to Outlook

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    Forget Folders: The Best Ways to Organize Your Files with Tags and Labels

    Trying to find old files is like trying to go back in time and read your own mind. Where would I have saved those pictures from Australia?!? you think, before spending a frustrating half hour digging through folders and folders of miscellaneous images. What would I have called that report I wrote in August ?!?

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    Tags (or labels in some apps) can eliminate these exasperating and time-consuming mental exercises. With a couple of tags, you can instantly categorize and label files for hassle-free searches down the road, Category Archives: MAC, and then find all of those files again easily no matter Category Archives: MAC you save them.

    Let's explore why tagging is so useful, and how to set up your own tag system. Then, we’ll dive into how to tag your emails, photos, notes, and files, and glance at the benefits of using tags alongside folders.



    Intro to Tagging

    Tags

    Tags are keywords you assign to files. Think of them like characteristics for a person: Just like you’d describe Category Archives: MAC as "tall," "funny," "brunette," and so on, Category Archives: MAC tag a file "important," "tax info," "just for fun," or "work."

    But why use tags, when you could just use folders?

    A file can only be in one folder at a time—but it could have an unlimited number of tags. Say you've made a project brief for a client and you want to save it in the specific project folder and to the client’s main folder. With folders, you'd have to pick AdwCleaner 8.1.0 + Crack [Latest Version]2021 Free Download folder or duplicate the file, which could cause issues. Tags, on the other hand, are perfect for adding Category Archives: MAC data like this, since you can add as many tags as you want to a file. You could tag the document with both the project’s name and the client’s name, then save the file just in the project's folder.

    Tags are the simplest way to add data to files without dealing with endless layers of folders. They're perhaps your most flexible tool for organizing your files.

    Related: Folders are still essential, however. Category Archives: MAC how to best organize your files and folders.

    Tagging Best Practices

    Of course, the flexibility and unlimited nature of tags can be dangerous. It’s easy to spend fifteen extra minutes adding a ton of tags every time you save a new file—and it’s also easy to create so many different tags that you completely forget which ones you’ve used.

    How to Establish a Tag System

    Luckily, you can avoid these issues by establishing a system, Category Archives: MAC. Your first step: Figure out your high-level tags. These types of tags divide your content into the most general categories possible, which usually means by type, Category Archives: MAC. Examples:

    • A bookstore creates separate spaces for books depending on their genre: mystery, romance, historical fiction, and so on.

    • If you’re making a tag system for your spreadsheets, your high-level tags might be "budget," "schedule," "estimate," "invoice," and "Gantt charts."

    • if you're building a system for documents, you could add tags for "reports," "blog posts," "letters," and so forth.

    Also consider making tags for the status of your files. I tag (or label) my emails as "Answer," "Done," "Pending," and "Ignore," for example. Being able to sort my inbox into these categories helps me stay on top of things.

    Make Your Tags Consistent

    Strive for consistency with your tags. For instance, will you use singular or plural terms ("report" versus "reports"?) Which word type will you use: nouns, adjectives, verbs, or a combination of the three? Are you going to capitalize tags or leave them lowercase? Will you incorporate symbols and characters? The more standardized your system is, the easier it’ll be to find files.

    As a rule of thumb, keep your tags to two words or less. If you find yourself going over that limit, it may make more sense to create two separate tags—for example, rather than tagging something as "Q1 expense report," you could tag it as "Q1" and "expense report."

    Once you’ve come up with plus tags, it’s a good idea to create a master list. I use an Evernote note to keep track of all my tags. This list helps jog my Category Archives: MAC if I ever forget a tag; plus, I can periodically look it over to find and delete tags I didn’t end up needing.

    Use Tags with Folders

    Ultimately, the researchers concluded the best system involves folders *and* tags. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

    Not everyone is a fan of using tags. Tiago Forte, founder of productivity training firm Forte Labs, explains, "When you rely heavily on tags, you have to perfectly recall every single tag you’ve ever used, Category Archives: MAC exactly how it is spelled and punctuated."

    Plus, Forte says, it’s much easier to remember things with physical locations. That’s why you have to concentrate on memorizing a single phone number, but you can immediately recall where you left hundreds of items in your home.

    "Tags force us to think about our notes in a completely abstract way," he argues. Folders, on the other hand, let us "place" our Category Archives: MAC in a single physical location.

    Forte definitely has a point. It can be time-consuming to tag every file—especially if you can’t remember those tags when you need them. If you’re producing a relatively small amount of work, using tags might not be productive.

    However, there’s also a case to be made for a folder and tag system.

    Four researchers from the University of Washington studied the comparative benefits folders and tags. According to their research, it’s easier to find files using labels rather than folders. Plus, picking out the right folder can take more work than choosing tags, because you have to select the "right" one. However, because folders let you visually put away your work, they make you feel more organized.

    Ultimately, the researchers concluded the best system involves folders and Jogos de Software de Graça para Baixar. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

    And great Category Archives: MAC we’ve got a comprehensive guide to organizing your files and folders.


    Now that you've got a tag system, let's put it to work. Here's how you can organize your email, photos, notes, Category Archives: MAC, and files with tags.

    Tag Your Email Messages

    We receive a lot of email each day—too much, in fact. Category Archives: MAC so many messages flowing in and out Category Archives: MAC your inbox, being able to quickly organize them with tags could make the difference between order and chaos.

    Gmail introduced labels (which are tags) to email when it first launched inand today it's still the leader in tagging emails. Here's how to use its tag tools to sort your messages.

    How to Label Emails in Gmail (Web, iOS, Android)

    Gmail

    To use labels in Gmail, you’ll have to manually tag each email or take a bit more time to create filters to add them. You can find the Labels option by clicking the gear icon, choosing "Settings," and navigating to the "Labels" tab.

    Scroll down to the bottom and select "Create new label." You can choose when the label shows up in your label list and inbox. If you have more than Category Archives: MAC labels, Category Archives: MAC recommend using the "show if unread" feature so they only show up when you have unopened emails.

    Gmail also lets you color-code labels for a way to identify them at a glance. Find Category Archives: MAC label in the sidebar, hover over it, and then click the small three-dot icon next to its name. Then select choose "Label color." You can choose from pre-existing colors, or even create your own.

    Tip: Learn how to get the most out of Gmail's labels—and add them to emails automatically with filters—in Zapier's Gmail Guide.

    Of course, Category Archives: MAC, other email programs also offer tagging or labeling options. In Microsoft Outlook, for example, common tags—called Categories—are already set up for you, but you can edit them, create new Category Archives: MAC, and color-code them too.

    Tag Your Photos

    Finding a specific picture can take forever, Category Archives: MAC. First, you have to remember where you saved it on your computer. Then, you have to dig through thousands of photos before finding the one you were looking for. Unless you name each photo, you can’t look up the title of a photo the same way you’d type in the name of a spreadsheet or presentation, so manually combing through your archives is typically your best option.

    Tags make finding photos far speedier. Just tag each with its location, subject, date, and the people in it, and you’ll have four different ways to locate it. Creating your own tags will give you even more options.

    You'll find tags in advanced photo management tools like Lightroom, but here are some simpler apps to help organize your photo library.

    Pixave (Mac)

    Pixave

    When you save multiple photos, you probably want to apply one or more tags to all of them. For instance, if you import 30 pictures from your last family reunion, you’d tag all 30 with "family reunion," the location, and the date. Pixave makes it easy to add multiple tags to multiple images at once. With its drag and drop Category Archives: MAC, you can simply highlight the relevant tags and place them on the matching pictures.

    When you’re exporting images, the app saves their tags as keywords in their metadata. That means you won’t have to go through the hard work of re-labeling images once you’ve moved them to another platform.

    And Pixave also automatically import images from a designated folder and apply tags for you. Talk about convenience!

    Price: $

    Google Photos (Web, iOS, Android)

    Google Photos

    Technically, Google Photos is the anti-tagging tool. There’s no way to add tags within the app—the closest you can get is adding labels to people’s faces (e.g. "Daniel" or "Aja").

    But Google Photos has such a powerful search, you'll feel like you've already added tags to every photo. It uses Google's AI to identify objects in your photos, so you can search for "watermelon" or "water sports" and find photos containing either in seconds.

    It's magical—and if every app's search worked this well, you wouldn't need tags nearly as much.

    Price: Free

    Tip: The latest version of Apple Photos includes similar features, identifying locations and common objects in the photos on your iPhone, iPad, and macOS.

    Tag Your Notes

    You probably take notes all day long: in the morning, when you think of a random idea; on the subway, when you jot down a question; at your desk, when Category Archives: MAC write down your goals for the next day, and so on. Recording your miscellaneous thoughts is helpful—but only if you can find them again later.

    Tags give you the power to organize a vast web of interconnected ideas, where saving notes in individual notebooks just won't cut it. Here's how to organize your notes with tags.

    Evernote (Web, macOS, PC, iOS, Android)

    Evernote clipper

    This notebook app wants to be your digital memory, Category Archives: MAC, housing everything from simple checklists and detailed checklists to images, PDFs, documents, and more. Of course, the more content you collect, the more important tags become.

    Evernote makes adding tags a cinch, Category Archives: MAC. If you use the app’s web extension, you can tag files while you save them. To tag a current note within the app, click the small "tag" icon next to the name of its notebook.

    It’s also easy to browse your notes by tag. On the left menu sidebar, click on "Tags" to see all of your tags.

    Evernote also lets you create nested tags, something you don't usually find with tags in other apps. For example, engineer Thomas Honeyman created a parent tag for "Projects" with three child tags: "Artistic projects," "Business projects," and "School projects."

    To create your own tag hierarchy, open up the "Tags" page, then drag and drop the sub-tag onto the main one.

    Tags appear alphabetically by default. If you want, say, "Work task" to appear before "Grocery list," use a hashtag, period, or symbol, Category Archives: MAC. The tags with non-alphanumeric symbols will show up last.

    Price: Free Basic plan for standard features for 2 devices and Borland C++ Builder 6.0 crack serial keygen to 60MB uploads per month; from $/month Premium plan for unlimited devices, 10GB monthly uploads, Category Archives: MAC, and features like offline notebook access; $/user/month for Evernote Business

    For a deeper look at Evernote features and pricing plans, check out ourEvernote review.

    See Evernote integrations on Zapier

    Learn more about Evernote with our roundup of 30 Evernote Tips and Tricks.

    OneNote (Web, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android)

    OneNote

    Looking for a way to tag specific sections of your notes, rather than the entire document? OneNote lets you do just that—and a lot more. Its searchable tags make it easy to pull up every related snippet of your work. For example, you can tag one part of your note with the "idea" tag and another as a "to do."

    When you search OneNote for a tag, the Tag Summary page will show you all the related notes and give you the option Category Archives: MAC grouping tags, too.

    Price: Free

    Tag Your Files

    The latest versions of macOS and Windows make it easy to add tags to almost anything.

    Mac

    Tagging on the Mac

    Thanks to macOS' tagging feature, you can find any file on your Mac in just three steps. Step one: press command + space to open Spotlight. Step two: enter your tag (or tags). Step three: look through the results to find the right file.

    But before you can become a master of the quick search, you’ll need to actually tag your files. It’s easy to add tags while saving a file: Just choose the relevant ones from the drop-down menu underneath the file’s name or type a new tag to add it to the list.

    If you want to tag a file you’ve already saved, find it in your Finder window, right-click, and select "Tags." You’ll be able to add existing tags or create new ones.

    By default, the built-in color tags show up in your Sidebar menu. However, you’ll probably want to customize this section so it displays your most important or frequently used tags. To do so, open Finder, Category Archives: MAC, click "Preferences," and select "Tags," then drag-and-drop the tags into the order you want. You can also change each tag’s color.

    Windows

    Tags in Windows

    Windows users can harness the power of tags as well. When you’re saving specific file types (including Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, Powerpoints, Category Archives: MAC, photos, videos, and new folders) you can add tags using the "Tags" field.

    Looking to label a file you’ve already saved? Click on it to open its details, then you should see the option to type new tags under the "Date created" field.

    For the majority of people, these options will be enough. But if you want to tag non-supported file types, like plain text (.txt) or rich text format (.rtf) files, upgrade to a third-party tagging app.

    Price: Free

    The Best Apps to Tag Your Files

    Not content with your computer’s built-in file management system? Luckily, there are plenty of third-party apps to choose from, Category Archives: MAC. These options all make it simple to add, edit, and find tags.

    TagSpaces (Web, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android, Linux)

    TagSpaces

    Most of us take Category Archives: MAC squirrel-like approach to our files, saving some in Dropbox, some on our computer, some in Google Drive, Category Archives: MAC, some in Evernote, and so forth, Category Archives: MAC. That means it’s tricky to find files even with tags—after all, Category Archives: MAC, before you can search "resume" and "marketing jobs," you have to first remember where you saved all your resume drafts.

    That's where TagSpaces comes in. This free app provides cross-platform file tagging and finding, so that you can organize everything the same way regardless of where it’s saved. In other words, if you type "resume" and "marketing jobs" into TagSpaces, it’ll search through Category Archives: MAC file you’ve ever saved to find the ones with those tags.

    However, that’s not the only reason to download TagSpaces. It also lets you bulk tag files, which is handy when you’re downloading, say, photos from your hackathon, or the presentations from a conference. Even better, you can create tag groups. To give you an idea, Category Archives: MAC, you could make a "sales team" tag group containing tags for each individual sales rep.

    Smart tags are also handy. These automatic, time-sensitive tags let you quickly find files by when you saved them; for instance, if you wanted to locate a document you’d saved this morning, you’d search with the "today" tag.

    Price: Free

    Tabbles (Windows)

    Tabbles

    Visual thinkers, rejoice: Tabbles was designed with you in mind. Every tag is represented by a colorful bubble called a "tabble." When you want to place a file into a tabble, you simply drag-and-drop it. That might sound a bit like putting a file into a folder, but files can belong to an unlimited number of tabbles at once.

    What if you’re putting the same types of files into the same tabbles over and over again? Rather than doing unnecessary work, set up tagging rules. You can define which tabbles new files are housed in based on their name, file type, content, or some combination of the above. As an example, imagine you want every Powerpoint file with "winter conference" in its name to be saved to the "Winter Conference" and "Work Presentations" tabbles.

    Tabbles is free for up to 5, files. Paid options offeryou can save an unlimited number of files; plus, you can integrate with cloud sync servers and share your tags with your coworkers.

    Price: Free for up to 5, files; from €1,5/month for paid options, which include more files, tag sharing, and syncing tags across multiple devices

    Turn Tags into Actions

    Does the thought of going through and tagging each and every file in your digital archives sound overwhelming? It did to me—so I decided to start fresh. Every new file I save gets tagged, but I don’t worry about the old ones. I’d definitely recommend this strategy if you’ve already got a full library of files and not enough time to categorize them all.

    If you want to take your tagging to the next level, create a workflow that sends information you tag in one app to another with Zapier, an app integration tool, Category Archives: MAC. You can automatically send messages from Gmail with a specific tag (label) to a new card in Trello, for example, or create notes with a specific tag in Evernote from one of your other favorite apps.

    Here are some ideas to help get you started turning tags into actions:

    Organize Emails and Contacts

    Save Tagged Articles

    Share Tagged Posts


    Happy tagging!

    This post was originally published in August and updated for current app info and other details.

    Title image by Metaphox via Flickr, Category Archives: MAC. Tags photo by Gustavo da Cunha Pimenta.

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    Find and delete files on your Mac

  • Applications, Music, TV, Messages, and Books: These categories list files individually. To delete an item, select the file, then click Delete.

    Note: If you delete an item that you got from the iTunes Store, the App Store, or Apple Books using your Apple ID, the item is still in iCloud, and you can download it again.

  • Documents: See all the documents on your Mac. You can quickly view large files or downloads by clicking the corresponding button, and sort files by clicking Name, Kind, Last Accessed, or Size near the top of the window. You can also click File Browser to view the contents and amount of storage used by various folders in your file system.

    Note: Some folders and files that are already Category Archives: MAC by categories in the sidebar—other than Documents—are dimmed.

    To delete a file, select it, then click Delete; click Show in Finder to view the file in the Finder.

  • iCloud Drive, Photos, Music Creation, and Mail: These categories provide general recommendations for optimizing storage. To accept the recommendation, click the button.

  • iOS files: See iOS backup and firmware files listed individually. To delete an item, select the file, then click Delete.

  • Trash: Click Empty Trash to erase all the items in the Trash.

  • Источник: [storycall.us]

    watch the thematic video

    How To Archive Files On a Mac

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