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b64encode }}" action: member
  • Save the file.
  • Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i storycall.us storycall.us
  •  Retrieving a service secret for an IdM service using Ansible

    This section shows how an Identity Management (IdM) user can use an Ansible playbook to retrieve a secret from a service vault on behalf of the service. In the example used in the procedure below, running the playbook retrieves a file with the secret from an asymmetric vault named secret_vault, and stores it in the specified location on all the hosts listed in the Ansible inventory file as .

    The services authenticate to IdM using keytabs, and they authenticate to the vault using a private key. You can retrieve the file on behalf of the service from any IdM client on which is installed.

    Prerequisites

    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller. This is the host on which you execute the steps in the procedure.
    • You know the IdM administrator password.
    • You have created an asymmetric vault to store the service secret.
    • You have archived the secret in the vault.
    • You have stored the private key used to retrieve the service vault secret in the location specified by the variable on the Ansible controller.

    Procedure

    1. Navigate to the directory:

      $ cd /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault
    2. Optional: Create an inventory file if it does not exist, for example storycall.us:

      $ touch storycall.us
    3. Open your inventory file and define the following hosts:

      • Define your IdM server in the section.
      • Define the hosts onto which you want to retrieve the secret in the section. For example, to instruct Ansible to retrieve the secret to storycall.us, storycall.us, and storycall.us, enter:
      [ipaserver] storycall.us [webservers] storycall.us storycall.us storycall.us
    4. Make a copy of the storycall.us Ansible playbook file. For example:

      $ cp storycall.us storycall.us
    5. Open the storycall.us file for editing.
    6. Modify the file by setting the following variables in the task section:

      • Set the variable to your IdM administrator password.
      • Set the variable to the name of the vault, for example secret_vault.
      • Set the variable to the service owner of the vault, for example HTTP/storycall.us.
      • Set the variable to the location of the private key used to retrieve the service vault secret.
      • Set the variable to the location on the IdM server where you want to retrieve the storycall.us secret, for example the current working directory.
      • Set the variable to .

        This the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

      - name: Retrieve data from vault hosts: ipaserver become: no gather_facts: false tasks: - name: Retrieve data from the service vault ipavault: ipaadmin_password: Secret name: secret_vault service: HTTP/storycall.us vault_type: asymmetric private_key: "{{ lookup('file', 'storycall.us') b64encode }}" out: storycall.us state: retrieved
    7. Add a section to the playbook that retrieves the data file from the IdM server to the Ansible controller:

      - name: Retrieve data from vault hosts: ipaserver become: yes gather_facts: false tasks: [] - name: Retrieve data file fetch: src: storycall.us dest: ./ flat: yes mode:
    8. Add a section to the playbook that transfers the retrieved storycall.us file from the Ansible controller on to the webservers listed in the section of the inventory file:

      - name: Send data file to webservers become: yes gather_facts: no hosts: webservers tasks: - name: Send data to webservers copy: src: storycall.us dest: /etc/pki/tls/private/storycall.us mode:
    9. Save the file.
    10. Run the playbook:

      $ ansible-playbook -v -i storycall.us storycall.us

    Additional resources

    • For more information about using Ansible to manage IdM vaults and service secrets and about playbook variables, see the storycall.us Markdown file available in the directory and the sample playbooks available in the directory.

    Copyright © Red Hat, Inc.

    The text of and illustrations in this document are licensed by Red Hat under a Creative Commons Attribution–Share Alike Unported license ("CC-BY-SA"). An explanation of CC-BY-SA is available at storycall.us In accordance with CC-BY-SA, if you distribute this document or an adaptation of it, you must provide the URL for the original version.

    Red Hat, as the licensor of this document, waives the right to enforce, and agrees not to assert, Section 4d of CC-BY-SA to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law.

    Red Hat, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, the Shadowman logo, the Red Hat logo, JBoss, OpenShift, Fedora, the Infinity logo, and RHCE are trademarks of Red Hat, Inc., registered in the United States and other countries.

    Linux® is the registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States and other countries.

    Java® is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates.

    XFS® is a trademark of Silicon Graphics International Corp. or its subsidiaries in the United States and/or other countries.

    MySQL® is a registered trademark of MySQL AB in the United States, the European Union and other countries.

    storycall.us® is an official trademark of Joyent. Red Hat is not formally related to or endorsed by the official Joyent storycall.us open source or commercial project.

    The OpenStack® Word Mark and OpenStack logo are either registered trademarks/service marks or trademarks/service marks of the OpenStack Foundation, in the United States and other countries and are used with the OpenStack Foundation's permission. We are not affiliated with, endorsed or sponsored by the OpenStack Foundation, or the OpenStack community.

    All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

    Источник: [storycall.us]
    b64encode }}" action: member
  • Save the file.
  • Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i storycall.us storycall.us
  • Open the storycall.us file for editing.
  • Modify the file by setting the following variables in the task section:

    • Set the variable to your IdM administrator password.
    • Set the variable to the name of the vault, for example secret_vault.
    • Set the variable to the service owner of the vault, for example HTTP/storycall.us.
    • Set the variable to the location of the private key used to retrieve the service vault secret.
    • Set the variable to the location on the IdM server where you want to retrieve the storycall.us secret, for example the current working directory.
    • Set the variable to .

      This the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    - name: Retrieve data from vault hosts: ipaserver become: no gather_facts: false tasks: - name: Retrieve data from the service vault ipavault: ipaadmin_password: Secret name: secret_vault service: HTTP/storycall.us vault_type: asymmetric private_key: "{{ lookup('file', 'storycall.us') b64encode }}". This ensures that Ansible retrieves the file with the private key from the working directory on the Ansible controller rather than from the IdM server.
  • Set the variable to .

    This the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

  • - name: Tests hosts: ipaserver become: true gather_facts: false tasks: - ipavault: ipaadmin_password: Secret name: secret_vault service: HTTP/storycall.us in: "{{ lookup('file', 'storycall.us') b64encode }}" out: storycall.us state: retrieved
  • Add a section to the playbook that retrieves the data file from the IdM server to the Ansible controller:

    - name: Retrieve data from vault hosts: ipaserver become: no gather_facts: false tasks: [] - name: Retrieve data file fetch: src: storycall.us dest: ./ flat: yes mode:
  • Add a section to the playbook that transfers the retrieved storycall.us file from the Ansible controller on to the webservers listed in the section of the inventory file:

    - name: Send data file to webservers become: no gather_facts: no hosts: webservers tasks: - name: Send data to webservers copy: src: storycall.us dest: /etc/pki/tls/private/storycall.us mode:
  • Save the file.
  • Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i storycall.us storycall.us
  •  Changing an IdM service vault secret when compromised using Ansible

    This section shows how an Identity Management (IdM) administrator can reuse an Ansible playbook to change the secret stored in a service vault when a service instance has been compromised. The scenario in the following example assumes that on storycall.us, the retrieved secret has been compromised, but not the key to the asymmetric vault storing the secret. In the example, the administrator reuses the Ansible playbooks used when storing a secret in an asymmetric vault and retrieving a secret from the asymmetric vault onto IdM hosts. At the start of the procedure, the IdM administrator stores a new file with a new secret in the asymmetric vault, adapts the inventory file so as not to retrieve the new secret on to the compromised web server, storycall.us, and then re-runs the two procedures.

    Prerequisites

    Procedure

    1. Navigate to the directory:

      $ cd /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault
    2. Open your inventory file and make sure that the following hosts are defined correctly:

      • The IdM server in the section.
      • The hosts onto which you want to retrieve the secret in the section. For example, to instruct Ansible to retrieve the secret to storycall.us and storycall.us, enter:

        [ipaserver] storycall.us [webservers] storycall.us storycall.us

      Make sure that the list does not contain the compromised webserver, in the current example storycall.us.

    3. Open the storycall.us file for editing.
    4. Modify the file by setting the following variables in the task section:

      • Set the variable to the IdM administrator password.
      • Set the variable to the name of the vault, for example secret_vault.
      • Set the variable to the service owner of the vault, for example HTTP/storycall.us.
      • Set the variable to "{{ lookup('file', 'storycall.us')

        Working with vaults in Identity Management

        Red Hat Enterprise Linux8

        Storing and managing sensitive data in Identity Management in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

        Red HatCustomer Content Services

        Legal Notice

        Abstract

        This documentation collection provides instructions on how to store, retrieve, and share secrets in Identity Management on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.


        Red Hat is committed to replacing problematic language in our code, documentation, and web properties. We are beginning with these four terms: master, slave, blacklist, and whitelist. Because of the enormity of this endeavor, these changes will be implemented gradually over several upcoming releases. For more details, see our CTO Chris Wright’s message.

        In Identity Management, planned terminology replacements include:

        • block list replaces blacklist
        • allow list replaces whitelist
        • secondary replaces slave
        • The word master is being replaced with more precise language, depending on the context:

          • IdM server replaces IdM master
          • CA renewal server replaces CA renewal master
          • CRL publisher server replaces CRL master
          • multi-supplier replaces multi-master

        We appreciate your input on our documentation. Please let us know how we could make it better. To do so:

        • For simple comments on specific passages:

          1. Make sure you are viewing the documentation in the Multi-page HTML format. In addition, ensure you see the Feedback button in the upper right corner of the document.
          2. Use your mouse cursor to highlight the part of text that you want to comment on.
          3. Click the Add Feedback pop-up that appears below the highlighted text.
          4. Follow the displayed instructions.
        • For submitting more complex feedback, create a Bugzilla ticket:

          1. Go to the Bugzilla website.
          2. As the Component, use Documentation.
          3. Fill in the Description field with your suggestion for improvement. Include a link to the relevant part(s) of documentation.
          4. Click Submit Bug.

        This chapter describes vaults in Identity Management (IdM). It introduces the following topics:

         Vaults and their benefits

        A vault is a useful feature for those Identity Management (IdM) users who want to keep all their sensitive data stored securely but conveniently in one place. This section explains the various types of vaults and their uses, and which vault you should choose based on your requirements.

        A vault is a secure location in (IdM) for storing, retrieving, sharing, and recovering a secret. A secret is security-sensitive data, usually authentication credentials, that only a limited group of people or entities can access. For example, secrets include:

        • passwords
        • PINs
        • private SSH keys

        A vault is comparable to a password manager. Just like a password manager, a vault typically requires a user to generate and remember one primary password to unlock and access any information stored in the vault. However, a user can also decide to have a standard vault. A standard vault does not require the user to enter any password to access the secrets stored in the vault.

        The purpose of vaults in IdM is to store authentication credentials that allow you to authenticate to external, non-IdM-related services.

        Other important characteristics of the IdM vaults are:

        • Vaults are only accessible to the vault owner and those IdM users that the vault owner selects to be the vault members. In addition, the IdM administrator has access to the vault.
        • If a user does not have sufficient privileges to create a vault, an IdM administrator can create the vault and set the user as its owner.
        • Users and services can access the secrets stored in a vault from any machine enrolled in the IdM domain.
        • One vault can only contain one secret, for example, one file. However, the file itself can contain multiple secrets such as passwords, keytabs or certificates.

        Vault is only available from the IdM command line (CLI), not from the IdM Web UI.

         Vault owners, members, and administrators

        Identity Management (IdM) distinguishes the following vault user types:

        Vault owner

        A vault owner is a user or service with basic management privileges on the vault. For example, a vault owner can modify the properties of the vault or add new vault members.

        Each vault must have at least one owner. A vault can also have multiple owners.

        Vault member
        A vault member is a user or service that can access a vault created by another user or service.
        Vault administrator

        Vault administrators have unrestricted access to all vaults and are allowed to perform all vault operations.

        Symmetric and asymmetric vaults are protected with a password or key and apply special access control rules (see Vault types). The administrator must meet these rules to:

        • Access secrets in symmetric and asymmetric vaults.
        • Change or reset the vault password or key.

        A vault administrator is any user with the privilege. In the context of the role-based access control (RBAC) in IdM, a privilege is a group of permissions that you can apply to a role.

        Vault User

        The vault user represents the user in whose container the vault is located. The information is displayed in the output of specific commands, such as :

        $ ipa vault-show my_vault Vault name: my_vault Type: standard Owner users: user Vault user: user

        For details on vault containers and user vaults, see Vault containers.

        Additional resources

         Standard, symmetric, and asymmetric vaults

        Based on the level of security and access control, IdM classifies vaults into the following types:

        Standard vaults
        Vault owners and vault members can archive and retrieve the secrets without having to use a password or key.
        Symmetric vaults
        Secrets in the vault are protected with a symmetric key. Vault owners and members can archive and retrieve the secrets, but they must provide the vault password.
        Asymmetric vaults
        Secrets in the vault are protected with an asymmetric key. Users archive the secret using a public key and retrieve it using a private key. Vault members can only archive secrets, while vault owners can do both, archive and retrieve secrets.

         User, service, and shared vaults

        Based on ownership, IdM classifies vaults into several types. The table below contains information about each type, its owner and use.

        Table  IdM vaults based on ownership

        TypeDescriptionOwnerNote

        User vault

        A private vault for a user

        A single user

        Any user can own one or more user vaults if allowed by IdM administrator

        Service vault

        A private vault for a service

        A single service

        Any service can own one or more user vaults if allowed by IdM administrator

        Shared vault

        A vault shared by multiple users and services

        The vault administrator who created the vault

        Users and services can own one or more user vaults if allowed by IdM administrator. The vault administrators other than the one that created the vault also have full access to the vault.

        A vault container is a collection of vaults. The table below lists the default vault containers that Identity Management (IdM) provides.

        Table  Default vault containers in IdM

        TypeDescriptionPurpose

        User container

        A private container for a user

        Stores user vaults for a particular user

        Service container

        A private container for a service

        Stores service vaults for a particular service

        Shared container

        A container for multiple users and services

        Stores vaults that can be shared by multiple users or services

        IdM creates user and service containers for each user or service automatically when the first private vault for the user or service is created. After the user or service is deleted, IdM removes the container and its contents.

         Basic IdM vault commands

        This section describes basic commands you can use to manage Identity Management (IdM) vaults. The table below contains a list of commands with the explanation of their purpose.

        Before running any command, install the Key Recovery Authority (KRA) certificate system component on one or more of the servers in your IdM domain. For details, see Installing the Key Recovery Authority in IdM.

        Table  Basic IdM vault commands with explanations

        CommandPurpose

        Displays conceptual information about IdM vaults and sample vault commands.

        ,

        Adding the option to a specific command displays the options and detailed help available for that command.

        When accessing a vault as a vault member, you must specify the vault owner. If you do not specify the vault owner, IdM informs you that it did not find the vault:

        [admin@server ~]$ ipa vault-show user_vault ipa: ERROR: user_vault: vault not found

        When accessing a shared vault, you must specify that the vault you want to access is a shared vault. Otherwise, IdM informs you it did not find the vault:

        [admin@server ~]$ ipa vault-show shared_vault ipa: ERROR: shared_vault: vault not found

         Installing the Key Recovery Authority in IdM

        This section describes how you can enable vaults in Identity Management (IdM) by installing the Key Recovery Authority (KRA) Certificate System (CS) component.

        Prerequisites

        • You are logged in as IdM administrator.
        • You are logged in as root on an IdM client.

        Procedure

        • Install the KRA:

          # ipa-kra-install

        You can install the first KRA of an IdM cluster on a hidden replica. However, installing additional KRAs requires temporarily activating the hidden replica before you install the KRA clone on a non-hidden replica. Then you can hide the originally hidden replica again.

        To make the vault service highly available, install the KRA on two IdM servers or more.

        Additional resources

        This chapter describes how to use user vaults in Identity Management. Specifically, it describes how a user can store a secret in an IdM vault, and how the user can retrieve it. The user can do the storing and the retrieving from two different IdM clients.

        Prerequisites

         Storing a secret in a user vault

        This section shows how a user can create a vault container with one or more private vaults to securely store files with sensitive information. In the example used in the procedure below, the idm_user user creates a vault of the standard type. The standard vault type ensures that idm_user will not be required to authenticate when accessing the file. idm_user will be able to retrieve the file from any IdM client to which the user is logged in.

        In the procedure:

        • idm_user is the user who wants to create the vault.
        • my_vault is the vault used to store the user’s certificate.
        • The vault type is , so that accessing the archived certificate does not require the user to provide a vault password.
        • storycall.us is the file containing the certificate that the user wants to store in the vault.

        Prerequisites

        • You know the password of idm_user.
        • You are logged in to a host that is an IdM client.

        Procedure

        1. Obtain the Kerberos ticket granting ticket (TGT) for :

          $ kinit idm_user
        2. Use the command with the option to create a standard vault:

          $ ipa vault-add my_vault --type standard Added vault "my_vault" Vault name: my_vault Type: standard Owner users: idm_user Vault user: idm_user

          Make sure the first user vault for a user is created by the same user. Creating the first vault for a user also creates the user’s vault container. The agent of the creation becomes the owner of the vault container.

          For example, if another user, such as , creates the first user vault for , the owner of the user’s vault container will also be , and will be unable to access the user vault or create new user vaults.

        3. Use the command with the option to archive the file into the vault:

          $ ipa vault-archive my_vault --in storycall.us Archived data into vault "my_vault"

         Retrieving a secret from a user vault

        As an Identity Management (IdM), you can retrieve a secret from your user private vault onto any IdM client to which you are logged in.

        This section shows how to retrieve, as an IdM user named idm_user, a secret from the user private vault named my_vault onto idm_storycall.us.

        Prerequisites

        • idm_user is the owner of my_vault.
        • idm_user has archived a secret in the vault.
        • my_vault is a standard vault, which means that idm_user does not have to enter any password to access the contents of the vault.

        Procedure

        1. SSH to idm_client as idm_user:

          $ ssh idm_user@idm_storycall.us
        2. Log in as :

          $ kinit user
        3. Use the command with the option to retrieve the contents of the vault and save them into the file.

          $ ipa vault-retrieve my_vault --out secret_storycall.us Retrieved data from vault "my_vault"

        Additional resources

        This chapter describes how to manage user vaults in Identity Management using the Ansible module. Specifically, it describes how a user can use Ansible playbooks to perform the following three consecutive actions:

        The user can do the storing and the retrieving from two different IdM clients.

        Prerequisites

         Ensuring the presence of a standard user vault in IdM using Ansible

        This section shows how an Identity Management (IdM) user can use an Ansible playbook to create a vault container with one or more private vaults to securely store sensitive information. In the example used in the procedure below, the idm_user user creates a vault of the standard type named my_vault. The standard vault type ensures that idm_user will not be required to authenticate when accessing the file. idm_user will be able to retrieve the file from any IdM client to which the user is logged in.

        Prerequisites

        • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller, that is the host on which you execute the steps in the procedure.
        • You know the password of idm_user.

        Procedure

        1. Navigate to the directory:

          $ cd /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault
        2. Create an inventory file, for example storycall.us:

          $ touch storycall.us
        3. Open storycall.us and define the IdM server that you want to configure in the section. For example, to instruct Ansible to configure storycall.us, enter:

          [ipaserver] storycall.us
        4. Make a copy of the storycall.us Ansible playbook file. For example:

          $ cp storycall.us storycall.us
        5. Open the storycall.us file for editing.
        6. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the task section:

          • Set the variable to idm_user.
          • Set the variable to the password of idm_user.
          • Set the variable to idm_user.
          • Set the variable to my_vault.
          • Set the variable to standard.

            This the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

          - name: Tests hosts: ipaserver become: true gather_facts: false tasks: - ipavault: ipaadmin_principal: idm_user ipaadmin_password: idm_user_password user: idm_user name: my_vault vault_type: standard
        7. Save the file.
        8. Run the playbook:

          $ ansible-playbook -v -i storycall.us storycall.us

         Archiving a secret in a standard user vault in IdM using Ansible

        This section shows how an Identity Management (IdM) user can use an Ansible playbook to store sensitive information in a personal vault. In the example used, the idm_user user archives a file with sensitive information named storycall.us in a vault named my_vault.

        Prerequisites

        • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller, that is the host on which you execute the steps in the procedure.
        • You know the password of idm_user.
        • idm_user is the owner, or at least a member user of my_vault.
        • You have access to storycall.us, the secret that you want to archive in my_vault.

        Procedure

        1. Navigate to the directory:

          $ cd /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault
        2. Open your inventory file and make sure that the IdM server that you want to configure is listed in the section. For example, to instruct Ansible to configure storycall.us, enter:

          [ipaserver] storycall.us
        3. Make a copy of the storycall.us Ansible playbook file but replace "symmetric" by "standard". For example:

          $ cp storycall.us storycall.us
        4. Open the storycall.us file for editing.
        5. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the task section:

          • Set the variable to idm_user.
          • Set the variable to the password of idm_user.
          • Set the variable to idm_user.
          • Set the variable to my_vault.
          • Set the variable to the full path to the file with sensitive information.
          • Set the variable to member.

            This the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

          - name: Tests hosts: ipaserver become: true gather_facts: false tasks: - ipavault: ipaadmin_principal: idm_user ipaadmin_password: idm_user_password user: idm_user name: my_vault in: /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault/storycall.us action: member
        6. Save the file.
        7. Run the playbook:

          $ ansible-playbook -v -i storycall.us storycall.us

         Retrieving a secret from a standard user vault in IdM using Ansible

        This section shows how an Identity Management (IdM) user can use an Ansible playbook to retrieve a secret from the user personal vault. In the example used in the procedure below, the idm_user user retrieves a file with sensitive data from a vault of the standard type named my_vault onto an IdM client named host01. idm_user does not have to authenticate when accessing the file. idm_user can use Ansible to retrieve the file from any IdM client on which Ansible is installed.

        Prerequisites

        • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller. This is the host on which you execute the steps in the procedure.
        • You know the password of idm_user.
        • idm_user is the owner of my_vault.
        • idm_user has stored a secret in my_vault.
        • Ansible can write into the directory on the IdM host into which you want to retrieve the secret.
        • idm_user can read from the directory on the IdM host into which you want to retrieve the secret.

        Procedure

        1. Navigate to the directory:

          $ cd /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault
        2. Open your inventory file and mention, in a clearly defined section, the IdM client onto which you want to retrieve the secret. For example, to instruct Ansible to retrieve the secret onto storycall.us, enter:

          [ipahost] storycall.us
        3. Make a copy of the storycall.us Ansible playbook file. Replace "symmetric" with "standard". For example:

          $ cp storycall.us storycall.us
        4. Open the storycall.us file for editing.
        5. Adapt the file by setting the variable to ipahost.
        6. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the task section:

          • Set the variable to idm_user.
          • Set the variable to the password of idm_user.
          • Set the variable to idm_user.
          • Set the variable to my_vault.
          • Set the variable to the full path of the file into which you want to export the secret.
          • Set the variable to retrieved.

            This the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

          - name: Tests hosts: ipahost become: true gather_facts: false tasks: - ipavault: ipaadmin_principal: idm_user ipaadmin_password: idm_user_password user: idm_user name: my_vault out: /tmp/password_storycall.us state: retrieved
        7. Save the file.
        8. Run the playbook:

          $ ansible-playbook -v -i storycall.us storycall.us

        Verification steps

        1. to host01 as user01:

          $ ssh user01@storycall.us
        2. View the file specified by the variable in the Ansible playbook file:

          $ vim /tmp/password_storycall.us

        You can now see the exported secret.

        • For more information about using Ansible to manage IdM vaults and user secrets and about playbook variables, see the storycall.us Markdown file available in the directory and the sample playbooks available in the directory.

        This section shows how an administrator can use the module to securely store a service secret in a centralized location. The vault used in the example is asymmetric, which means that in order to use it, the administrator needs to perform the following steps:

        1. Generate a private key using, for example, the utility.
        2. Generate a public key based on the private key.

        The service secret is encrypted with the public key when an administrator archives it into the vault. Afterwards, a service instance hosted on a specific machine in the domain retrieves the secret using the private key. Only the service and the administrator are allowed to access the secret.

        If the secret is compromised, the administrator can replace it in the service vault and then redistribute it to those individual service instances that have not been compromised.

        Prerequisites

        This section includes these procedure

        Terminology used

        In the procedures:

        • admin is the administrator who manages the service password.
        • storycall.us is the file containing the service secret, in this case a private key to an externally signed certificate. Do not confuse this private key with the private key used to retrieve the secret from the vault.
        • secret_vault is the vault created for the service.
        • HTTP/storycall.us is the service whose secret is being archived.
        • storycall.us is the service public key used to encrypt the password stored in password_vault.
        • storycall.us is the service private key used to decrypt the password stored in secret_vault.

         Storing an IdM service secret in an asymmetric vault

        This section describes how to create an asymmetric vault and use it to archive a service secret.

        Prerequisites

        • You know the IdM administrator password.

        Procedure

        1. Log in as the administrator:

          $ kinit admin
        2. Obtain the public key of the service instance. For example, using the utility:

          1. Generate the private key.

            $ openssl genrsa -out storycall.us Generating RSA private key, bit long modulus .+++ +++ e is (0x)
          2. Generate the public key based on the private key.

            $ openssl rsa -in storycall.us -out storycall.us -pubout writing RSA key
        3. Create an asymmetric vault as the service instance vault, and provide the public key:

          $ ipa vault-add secret_vault --service HTTP/storycall.us --type asymmetric --public-key-file storycall.us Added vault "secret_vault" Vault name: secret_vault Type: asymmetric Public key: LS0tLS1CS0tLS0tCg== Owner users: admin Vault service: HTTP/storycall.us@storycall.us

          The password archived into the vault will be protected with the key.

        4. Archive the service secret into the service vault:

          $ ipa vault-archive secret_vault --service HTTP/storycall.us --in storycall.us Archived data into vault "secret_vault"

          This encrypts the secret with the service instance public key.

        Repeat these steps for every service instance that requires the secret. Create a new asymmetric vault for each service instance.

         Retrieving a service secret for an IdM service instance

        This section describes how a service instance can retrieve the service vault secret using a locally-stored service private key.

        Prerequisites

        Procedure

        1. Log in as the administrator:

          $ kinit admin
        2. Obtain a Kerberos ticket for the service:

          # kinit HTTP/storycall.us -k -t /etc/httpd/conf/storycall.us
        3. Retrieve the service vault password:

          $ ipa vault-retrieve secret_vault --service HTTP/storycall.us --private-key-file storycall.us --out storycall.us Retrieved data from vault "secret_vault"

         Changing an IdM service vault secret when compromised

        This section describes how to isolate a compromised service instance by changing the service vault secret.

        Prerequisites

        • You know the IdM administrator password.
        • You have created an asymmetric vault to store the service secret.
        • You have generated the new secret and have access to it, for example in the storycall.us file.

        Procedure

        1. Archive the new secret into the service instance vault:

          $ ipa vault-archive secret_vault --service HTTP/storycall.us --in storycall.us Archived data into vault "secret_vault"

          This overwrites the current secret stored in the vault.

        2. Retrieve the new secret on non-compromised service instances only. For details, see Retrieving a service secret for an IdM service instance.

        Additional resources

        This section shows how an administrator can use the module to securely store a service secret in a centralized location. The vault used in the example is asymmetric, which means that in order to use it, the administrator needs to perform the following steps:

        1. Generate a private key using, for example, the utility.
        2. Generate a public key based on the private key.

        The service secret is encrypted with the public key when an administrator archives it into the vault. Afterwards, a service instance hosted on a specific machine in the domain retrieves the secret using the private key. Only the service and the administrator are allowed to access the secret.

        If the secret is compromised, the administrator can replace it in the service vault and then redistribute it to those individual service instances that have not been compromised.

        Prerequisites

        This section includes these procedures:

        In the procedures:

        • admin is the administrator who manages the service password.
        • storycall.us is the file containing the service secret, in this case a private key to an externally signed certificate. Do not confuse this private key with the private key used to retrieve the secret from the vault.
        • secret_vault is the vault created to store the service secret.
        • HTTP/storycall.us is the service that is the owner of the vault.
        • HTTP/storycall.us and HTTP/storycall.us are the vault member services.
        • storycall.us is the service public key used to encrypt the password stored in password_vault.
        • storycall.us is the service private key used to decrypt the password stored in secret_vault.

         Ensuring the presence of an asymmetric service vault in IdM using Ansible

        This section shows how an Identity Management (IdM) administrator can use an Ansible playbook to create a service vault container with one or more private vaults to securely store sensitive information. In the example used in the procedure below, the administrator creates an asymmetric vault named secret_vault. This ensures that the vault members have to authenticate using a private key in order to retrieve the secret in the vault. The vault members will be able to retrieve the file from any IdM client.

        Prerequisites

        • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller. This is the host on which you execute the steps in the procedure.
        • You know the IdM administrator password.

        Procedure

        1. Navigate to the directory:

          $ cd /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault
        2. Obtain the public key of the service instance. For example, using the utility:

          1. Generate the private key.

            $ openssl genrsa -out storycall.us Generating RSA private key, bit long modulus .+++ +++ e is (0x)
          2. Generate the public key based on the private key.

            $ openssl rsa -in storycall.us -out storycall.us -pubout writing RSA key
        3. Optional: Create an inventory file if it does not exist, for example storycall.us:

          $ touch storycall.us
        4. Open your inventory file and define the IdM server that you want to configure in the section. For example, to instruct Ansible to configure storycall.us, enter:

          [ipaserver] storycall.us
        5. Make a copy of the storycall.us Ansible playbook file. For example:

          $ cp storycall.us storycall.us
        6. Open the storycall.us file for editing.
        7. Add a task that copies the storycall.us public key from the Ansible controller to the storycall.us server.
        8. Modify the rest of the file by setting the following variables in the task section:

          • Set the variable to the IdM administrator password.
          • Define the name of the vault using the variable, for example secret_vault.
          • Set the variable to asymmetric.
          • Set the variable to the principal of the service that owns the vault, for example HTTP/storycall.us.
          • Set the to the location of your public key.

            This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

          - name: Tests hosts: ipaserver become: true gather_facts: false tasks: - name: Copy public key to ipaserver. copy: src: /path/to/storycall.us dest: /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault/storycall.us mode: - name: Add data to vault, from a LOCAL file. ipavault: ipaadmin_password: Secret name: secret_vault vault_type: asymmetric service: HTTP/storycall.us public_key_file: /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault/storycall.us
        9. Save the file.
        10. Run the playbook:

          $ ansible-playbook -v -i storycall.us storycall.us

         Adding member services to an asymmetric vault using Ansible

        This section shows how an Identity Management (IdM) administrator can use an Ansible playbook to add member services to a service vault so that they can all retrieve the secret stored in the vault. In the example used in the procedure below, the IdM administrator adds the HTTP/storycall.us and HTTP/storycall.us service principals to the secret_vault vault that is owned by HTTP/storycall.us.

        Prerequisites

        • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller. This is the host on which you execute the steps in the procedure.
        • You know the IdM administrator password.
        • You have created an asymmetric vault to store the service secret.

        Procedure

        1. Navigate to the directory:

          $ cd /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault
        2. Optional: Create an inventory file if it does not exist, for example storycall.us:

          $ touch storycall.us
        3. Open your inventory file and define the IdM server that you want to configure in the section. For example, to instruct Ansible to configure storycall.us, enter:

          [ipaserver] storycall.us
        4. Make a copy of the storycall.us Ansible playbook file. For example:

          $ cp storycall.us storycall.us
        5. Open the storycall.us file for editing.
        6. Modify the file by setting the following variables in the task section:

          • Set the variable to the IdM administrator password.
          • Set the variable to the name of the vault, for example secret_vault.
          • Set the variable to the service owner of the vault, for example HTTP/storycall.us.
          • Define the services that you want to have access to the vault secret using the variable.
          • Set the variable to .

            This the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

          - name: Tests hosts: ipaserver become: true gather_facts: false tasks: - ipavault: ipaadmin_password: Secret name: secret_vault service: HTTP/storycall.us services: - HTTP/storycall.us - HTTP/storycall.us action: member
        7. Save the file.
        8. Run the playbook:

          $ ansible-playbook -v -i storycall.us storycall.us

         Storing an IdM service secret in an asymmetric vault using Ansible

        This section shows how an Identity Management (IdM) administrator can use an Ansible playbook to store a secret in a service vault so that it can be later retrieved by the service. In the example used in the procedure below, the administrator stores a file with the secret in an asymmetric vault named secret_vault. This ensures that the service will have to authenticate using a private key in order to retrieve the secret from the vault. The vault members will be able to retrieve the file from any IdM client.

        Prerequisites

        • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller. This is the host on which you execute the steps in the procedure.
        • You know the IdM administrator password.
        • You have created an asymmetric vault to store the service secret.
        • The secret is stored locally on the Ansible controller, for example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault/storycall.us file.

        Procedure

        1. Navigate to the directory:

          $ cd /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/vault
        2. Optional: Create an inventory file if it does not exist, for example storycall.us:

          $ touch storycall.us
        3. Open your inventory file and define the IdM server that you want to configure in the section. For example, to instruct Ansible to configure storycall.us, enter:

          [ipaserver] storycall.us
        4. Make a copy of the storycall.us Ansible playbook file. For example:

          $ cp storycall.us storycall.us
        5. Open the storycall.us file for editing.
        6. Modify the file by setting the following variables in the task section:

          • Set the variable to the IdM administrator password.
          • Set the variable to the name of the vault, for example secret_vault.
          • Set the variable to the service owner of the vault, for example HTTP/storycall.us.
          • Set the variable to "{{ lookup('file', 'storycall.us')
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            Источник: [storycall.us]
            IDM Archives s

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