The National Archives (United Kingdom) - Wikipedia

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Are you using the Right \ Welcome", office professiona Archives. storycall.us. Retrieved 15 November
  • ^Archives, The National. "Manorial Documents Register – The National Archives". Archives sector. Retrieved 15 November
  • ^"The National Archives Annual Report and Resource Accounts – HC "(PDF). Archived(PDF) from the original on 2 March Retrieved 1 February
  • ^"storycall.us &#; Revel Mob – developing best-selling smartphone apps". Revel Mob. Archived from the original on 28 January Retrieved 1 February
  • ^"Old Money", office professiona Archives. storycall.us Archived from the original on 22 January Retrieved 1 February
  • ^"Old Money iPhone app launched using records from The National Archives". storycall.us Archived from the original on 25 January Retrieved 1 February
  • ^"New collaboration between Wikimedia UK and The National Archives". The National Archives (United Kingdom). 15 September Archived from the original on 26 August Office professiona Archives 16 September
  • ^Archives, The National. "Blogposts

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    The State Archives of North Carolina is firmly committed to collecting, preserving, and providing public access to historically significant archival materials relating to office professiona Archives North Carolinians.

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    Источник: [storycall.us]
    The National Archives Blog". The National Archives blog. Retrieved 18 November
  • ^Archives, The National. "Home – Archives Media Player". Archives Media Player. Retrieved 18 November
  • ^Archives, The National. "Archives inspire – Office professiona Archives National Archives". storycall.us. Archived from the original on 9 December Retrieved 8 May
  • ^ abcdefghiFenton, Ben (3 May ). "Lies and secrets". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 6 May
  • ^ abFenton, Ben (3 May ), office professiona Archives. "Himmler forgeries in National Archives case will stay unsolved". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 6 May Retrieved 1 February
  • ^Holehouse, Matthew, office professiona Archives. "Hundreds of historic papers lost from National Archives", office professiona Archives. storycall.us. Retrieved 24 April
  • ^Cobain, Ian, office professiona Archives. "Government admits 'losing' thousands of papers from National Archives". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 April
  • ^Bateman, Tom. "More than government files missing from National Archives". BBC News. Retrieved 23 April
  • ^ ab"MI5 At The National Archives MI5 – The Security Service". storycall.us. Retrieved 25 November
  • ^Norton-Taylor, Richard (29 December ). "For their eyes only: the secret stories ministers don't want you to read

    The National Archives (United Kingdom)

    Repository of archival information for the United Kingdom

    Logo of The National Archives of the United storycall.usoffice professiona Archives width="" height="">
    FormedApril&#;&#;()
    JurisdictionEngland and Wales, Government of the United Kingdom
    HeadquartersKew, Richmond, Greater London TW9 4DU
    51°28′52″N0°16′46″W / °N °W / ; Coordinates: 51°28′52″N0°16′46″W / °N °W / ;
    Employees
    Annual budget£ million (–)[1]
    Ministers responsible
    Non-ministerial department executive
    • Jeff James, Chief Executive and Keeper of the Public Records
    Parent departmentDepartment for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
    Child agencies
    • Office of Public Sector Information
    • Her Majesty's Stationery Office
    Key document
    Websitestorycall.usEdit this at Wikidata
    The National Archives building office professiona Archives Kew

    The National Archives (TNA, Welsh: Yr Archifau Cenedlaethol) is a non-ministerial government department.[2] Its parent department is the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport of the United Kingdom of Great Britain office professiona Archives Northern Ireland.[3] It is office professiona Archives official archive of the UK government and for England office professiona Archives Wales; and "guardian of some of the nation's most iconic documents, dating back more than 1, office professiona Archives, years."[4] There are separate national archives for Scotland (the National Records of Scotland) and Northern Ireland (the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland).

    TNA was formerly four separate organisations: office professiona Archives Public Record Office (PRO), the Historical Manuscripts Commission, the Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI) and Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO). The Public Record Office still exists as a legal entity, as the enabling legislation has not been modified,[5][6] and documents held by the institution thus continue to be cited by many scholars as part of the PRO.[7] SinceTNA has also hosted office professiona Archives former UK Statute Law Database, now known as storycall.us

    It is institutional policy to include the definite article, with an initial capital letter, in its name (hence "The National Archives", abbreviated as TNA) but this practice is not always followed in the non-specialist media.

    The department is the responsibility of the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Arts, Heritage and Tourism; a minister in the Government of the United Kingdom.[8]

    Location[edit]

    The National Archives is based in Kew in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in south-west London, office professiona Archives. The building was opened in as an additional home for the public records, which were held in a building on Chancery Lane, office professiona Archives. The site was originally a World War I hospital, which was later used by several government departments.[9] It is near to Kew Gardens Underground station.

    Until its closure in Marchthe Family Records Centre in Islington was run jointly by The National Archives and the General Register Office. The National Archives has an additional office in Norwich, which is primarily for former OPSI staff. There is also an additional record storage facility (DeepStore[10]) office professiona Archives the worked-out parts of Winsford Rock Salt Mine, Winsford, Cheshire.

    History[edit]

    For earlier history, office professiona Archives, see Public Record Office.

    The National Archives was created in by combining the Public Record Office and the Historical Manuscripts Commission and is a non-ministerial department reporting to the Minister of State for digital policy.

    On 31 OctoberThe National Archives merged with the Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI), which itself also contained Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO) which was previously a part of the Cabinet Office. The name remained The National Archives.

    Chief Executive and Keeper[edit]

    Key roles[edit]

    A manuscript and seals being examined at the archives

    TNA claims it is "at the heart of information policy—setting standards and supporting innovation in information and records management across the UK, and providing a practical framework of best practice for opening up and encouraging the re-use of public sector information.[13] This work helps inform today's decisions and ensure that they become tomorrow's permanent record." It has a number of key roles in information policy:

    • Policy – advising government on information practice and policy, on issues from record creation through to its reuse
    • Selection – selecting which documents to store
    • Preservation – ensuring the documents remain in as good a condition as possible
    • Access – providing the public with the opportunity to view the documents
    • Advice – advising the public and other archives and archivists around the world on how to care for documents
    • Intellectual property management – TNA (via OPSI and HMSO) manages crown copyright for the UK
    • Regulation – ensuring that other public sector organisations adhere to both the public records act and the PSI reuse regulations.

    Sector leadership[edit]

    The National Archives (and before it the Public Record Office) has long had a role of oversight and leadership for the entire archives sector and archives profession in the UK, including local government and non-governmental archives. Under the Public Records Act it is responsible for overseeing the appropriate custody of certain non-governmental public records in England and Wales.[14] Under the Historical Manuscripts Commission Warrant it has responsibility for investigating and reporting on non-governmental records and archives of all kinds throughout the United Kingdom.[15] In Octoberwhen the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council was wound up, TNA took over its responsibilities in respect of archives in England, including providing information and advice to ministers on archives policy. The National Archives now sees this part of its role as being "to enhance the 'archival health of the nation'".[16]

    Collections[edit]

    Types of records[edit]

    Entrance gates to The National Archives from Ruskin Avenue: the notched vertical elements were inspired by medieval tally sticks.

    The National Archives is Her Majesty's Government's official archive, "containing years of history from Domesday Book to the present", with records from parchment and paper scrolls through to digital files and archived websites.[17] The material held at Kew includes the following:

    • Documents from the central courts of law from the twelfth century onwards, including the Court of King's Bench, the Court of Common Pleas, the Court of Chancery, the Court of Exchequer, the Supreme Court of Judicature, the Central Criminal Court, Assizes, and many other courts
    • Medieval, early modern and modern records of central government
    • A large and disparate collection of maps, plans and architectural drawings
    • Records for family historians including wills, naturalisation certificates and criminal records
    • Service and operational records of the armed forces War Office, Admiralty etc.
    • Foreign Office and Colonial Office correspondence and files
    • Cabinet papers and Home Office records
    • Statistics of the Board of Trade
    • The surviving records of (mainly) the English railway companies, transferred from the British Railways Record Office

    There is also a museum, which displays key documents such as Domesday Book and has exhibitions on various topics using material from the collections.[18]

    Access to documents[edit]

    Researchers at the archive
    office professiona Archives src="storycall.us" width="" height="">
    Researcher's point of view: Document open at assigned table, with foam supports to prevent binding from breaking

    The collections held by the National Archives can be searched using their online catalogue.[19]

    Entrance to The National Archives is free.[20] Anybody aged 16 or over can access the original documents at the Kew site, after producing two acceptable proofs of identity and being issued a free reader's ticket.[21]

    The reading room has terminals from which documents can office professiona Archives ordered up from secure storage areas by their reference number. The reference number is composed of three sections: the department code of up to four letters, such as WO for the War Office; a series or class number, for the "subcategory" or collection that the document comes from; and an individual document number. Documents can also be ordered in advance.[22]

    Once a document has been ordered, The National Archives aims to get it to the reader within 45 minutes (assuming it is kept at Kew rather than at their second repository, "Deep Store" – a former salt mine in Cheshire: it can take 2–3 days for files to be retrieved from the latter). Special arrangements are in place for readers wishing to retrieve large groups of files.

    A reader's ticket is not needed to access records on microform or online. Frequently accessed documents such as the Abdication Papers have been put on microfilm, as have records for two million First World War soldiers. The originals of the latter were stored in a warehouse in London along with four million others, but incendiary bombs dropped on the warehouse in the Second World War started a fire in which most were destroyed. The surviving third were largely water or fire-damaged and thus acquired the colloquial name of the "Burnt Documents." Because they were mostly too fragile for public access, they were put on microfilm with the aid of the Heritage Lottery Fund. They have now also been digitised and are available on the Ancestry website.[23]

    Some of the most popular documents have now been digitised and are available to download from Discovery, for a fee of £ per file,[24] or through co-branded services called licensed Internet associates (LIA) as pay per view or part of their subscription service.[25] A list of records online is available under the records, catalogues and online office professiona Archives menu on The National Archives' website.[26]

    All of the open census records have been digitised, and there are also significant other sources online, office professiona Archives, such as wills proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, – Researchers are encouraged to check the office professiona Archives services first, to see if they can get what they want online. If a document is available online, The National Archives' policy is to encourage people to use the digital copy and not the original, office professiona Archives, even if they come to Kew, in order to protect the original from damage.

    Storage[edit]

    Moveable shelving in one of the more modern repositories

    The documents are stored on mobile shelving – double-sided shelves, which are pushed together so that there is no aisle between them. A large handle on the end of each shelf allows them to be moved along tracks in the floor to create an aisle when needed.

    They are generally stored in acid-free folders or boxes.

    In the event of office professiona Archives fire The National Archives would be clearly unable to use sprinklers for fear office professiona Archives ruining its holdings, and so when the building is evacuated, argon gas is released office professiona Archives the air-tight repositories.

    Other services[edit]

    The National Archives also provides services to help users in their research and also find collections beyond those it holds.

    Education[edit]

    National Archives at the London University School of Advanced Studies History Day, November

    The National Archives' education web page is a free online resource for teaching and learning history, aimed at teachers and students.[27] Users can select time periods they are interested in, from the medieval era to the present day. Each time period contains sub-topics with various materials that can be used as teaching tools for teachers.[28] Resources for students focus primarily on tips for research and office professiona Archives using archival materials.[29]

    "Access to Archives"[edit]

    Access to Archives (also known as A2A)[30] is a database containing details of archival collections held in many different archive repositories in England and Wales.[31] As of Marchthere are no more plans to add additional collections to A2A due to lack of funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund and the changing financial priorities of The National Archives, but existing entries can still be updated.[32] The A2A database was transferred to The National Archives with a new platform with a simpler interface to ensure its availability.[33]

    National Register of Archives[edit]

    A researcher at the archives

    The National Register of Archives (NRA)[34] office professiona Archives the central point for the collection and circulation of information about the content and nature of archival manuscripts relating to British history.[35] It contains published and unpublished lists and catalogues describing archival collections in the UK and overseas: currently over office professiona Archives, such catalogues are included.[36] The register can be consulted in the National Archives reading room and the index used to be searchable as an online database on the National Archives web site.[35]

    The information office professiona Archives collected in a variety of ways. TNA is sent hard-copy catalogues from archive repositories holding records relating to British history. These are kept in the reading room at The National Archives and indexed in the online database. TNA conducts an annual survey of archive repositories and records all new accessions, and the accession lists[37] are also available on TNA's website. Information is also obtained from surveys and guides to archival collections, and other publications.[35]

    The Register includes name indexes to its contents (covering corporate names, personal names, family names, and place names); but not subject or thematic indexes.[35] Where the catalogues are themselves available online the indexes provide direct electronic links; but many still exist in hard copy only (often as unpublished "grey literature"), and it remains necessary for the researcher to visit either TNA or the specific repository in order to consult them.

    A separate National Register of Archives for Scotland is maintained at the National Archives of Scotland, but its contents are duplicated within the NRA at Kew.

    ARCHON directory[edit]

    ARCHON Directory is a database of contact details for archive repositories in the UK and institutions elsewhere in the world which have substantial collections of manuscripts relating to British history.[38]

    "Your Archives"[edit]

    Your Archives[39] is a wiki for the National Archives on-line community which was launched in May ; it was closed for editing on 30 September in preparation of archiving on the Government web archive.[40] The contributions are made by users to give additional information to that which is available on the other services provided by the National Archives, including the catalogue, research guides, documentonline and National Register of Archive.[41] Your Archives encourages users to create articles not only about historical records held by the National Archives, but those held in other office professiona Archives repositories.[42]

    Databases[edit]

    The National Archives also hosts several databases on types of records including hospital records;[43] migration records;[44] and manorial records.[45][46]

    Working with the Wellcome Library, TNA has made hospital records available via the Hospital Records Database. The Hospital Records Database has not been updated sinceand there are no current updates occurring as of [47]

    The Manorial Documents Register includes records relating to manors located in England and Wales. Digitization of the records is on-going as of [48]

    Civil Pages[edit]

    The National Archives operates the Civil Pages project on behalf of the Cabinet Office, operating as an online directory for the civil service, facilitating working together and providing a means of sharing knowledge securely between government departments.[49]

    Smartphone applications[edit]

    In January The National Archives, in conjunction with historian Nick Barratt and smartphone applications development studio RevelMob,[50] developed its first Old Money iPhone app,[51] which uses historic price data from documents held at The National Archives to see what a sum of money from the past (from ) would be worth today and the spending power it would have commanded at the time.[52]

    In SeptemberTNA's museum began using QRpedia codes, which can be scanned by smartphone users in order to retrieve information about exhibits from Wikipedia.[53]

    Blogs and podcasts[edit]

    TNA regularly posts blogs to its website. Posts cover a wide range of topics, from specific events and time periods to features on holdings in TNA, as well as information on the archive's operations.[54]

    The "Archives Media Player" section holds videos and podcasts created and posted by TNA. Videos and audio are not posted as regularly as TNA's blog.[55]

    The Future: Archives Inspire –19[edit]

    Archives Inspire[56] is a strategy document that sets out the goals and priorities of the organisation over four years, from onwards.

    Forgeries discovered in [edit]

    In Junejournalist Ben Fenton of The Daily Telegraph received an email from a colleague asking him to investigate documents held at TNA that alleged that a British intelligence agent had, on the orders of Winston Churchill, murdered Heinrich Himmler, the head of the NaziSS, in [57] The three documents had come to prominence after being revealed by author Martin Allen in his book Himmler's Secret War.[57]

    On viewing photographs of the documents, Fenton's suspicions were immediately aroused by the fact that such a controversial policy was casually committed to paper, office professiona Archives, even to the extent of naming the assassin, and by the use of colourful language.[57] Viewing the original documents the next day, Fenton spotted what looked like pencil marks beneath the signature on one of them. This confirmed his suspicions and, along with his experience of office professiona Archives historic documents, it enabled him to persuade The Daily Telegraph to pay for forensic analysis.[57]

    TNA staff took four files, along with office professiona Archives copies of the authors' handwriting, office professiona Archives, to Dr Audrey Giles, a former head of Scotland Yard's Questioned Documents Unit, who confirmed that the documents were forgeries. One letter head had been printed on a laser printer and all had tear marks where they had been threaded on to the security YouCam4 crack serial keygen. Further investigations by TNA staff revealed that the counterfeit documents contained errors, office professiona Archives, breaches of protocol and etiquette which their supposed authors would not have committed.[57]

    After his account of the deception appeared in the newspaper, office professiona Archives, Fenton was contacted by a German academic, Ernst Haiger, who informed him of his own suspicions over other TNA documents cited in an earlier Allen book. Examination by TNA experts led to more than a dozen documents being identified as suspicious and submitted to Home Office specialists for examination. When they, too, were declared forgeries, the TNA called office professiona Archives the police.[57]

    In the addendum to the later American edition of the book (which acknowledged that the papers were forged), Allen theorised that, some time after he saw the documents, they had been removed and replaced with clumsily forged replicas, to cast doubt upon his discoveries.[57]

    In all, twenty-nine forged documents were discovered, each typed on one of only four typewriters. They were placed in twelve separate files, and cited at least once in one or more of Allen's three books. According to the experts at TNA, documents now shown to be forgeries supported controversial arguments central to each of Allen's books: in Hidden Agenda, five documents now known to be forged helped justify his claim that the Duke of Windsor betrayed military secrets to Hitler; in The Hitler/Hess Deception, office professiona Archives, thirteen forged papers supported Allen's contention that, inBritish intelligence used members of the Royal Family to fool the Nazis into thinking Britain was on the verge of a pro-German putsch; in Himmler's Secret War, twenty-two counterfeit papers also underpinned the book's core claims that British intelligence played mind games with Himmler to encourage him to betray Hitler from onwards, and that ultimately they murdered Dr. Salmans Windows Power Tools v1.35 crack serial keygen SS chief.[57]

    In the Crown Prosecution Service announced that it was "not in the public interest" to prosecute the only suspect questioned by police. Allen's health problems had prevented the police questioning him for nine months, after which he told them he office professiona Archives wholly innocent. In a December response to questions from Norman Baker MP, the Solicitor-General said that the police investigation, guided by the opinion of a senior barrister, had produced "sufficient evidence for a realistic prospect of conviction" on charges of forgery, using a forged document and criminal damage but it had been decided that it was not in the public interest to proceed. In reaching that decision, "matters relating to Mr Allen's health and the surrounding circumstances were significant in deciding that a prosecution was not in the public interest".[57]

    a well-planned attempt to corrupt the UK's primary source of historical information

    —&#;Detective Inspector Andy Perrott, Financial Times, 3 May [58]

    It is hard to imagine actions more damaging to the cause of preserving the nation's heritage, than wilfully forging documents designed to alter our historical record.

    —&#;Historian Sir Max Hastings, office professiona Archives, Financial Times, 3 May [58]

    Lost and misplaced records[edit]

    Between andoffice professiona Archives, over files had been reported missing from the archives. Notable items reported missing during this period included correspondence from Winston Churchill and documents from the courts of several monarchies. Around of these records have since been recovered, and the archives has reported that they believe most are misplaced rather than permanently lost.[59] Inthe archives again received attention when it was reported that around files had been removed – in part or whole – by government officials and reported as missing when not returned, office professiona Archives. In response to concerns stated by politicians and historians about management of the collection, the archives stressed that the number of missing files is quite small in proportion the entire holdings of the repository – about % – and that, as ofits loss rate was only office professiona Archives documents, annually.[60][61]

    MI5 records at TNA[edit]

    TNA receives records from MI5 around twice a year.[62] Some information in records—or records themselves—are withheld at the discretion of MI5.[62]

    MI5 records in the news[edit]

    MI5 records relating to British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's time in office have caused some questions and controversy regarding the transparency of the British government. Injournalist Richard Norton-Taylor argued that MI5, and the British government by extension, was office professiona Archives withholding some information that the public deserves to know.[63] Norton-Taylor specifically refers office professiona Archives Thatcher's reluctance to allow the publication of two books looking into the impact that intelligence organizations of Britain had on World War II, office professiona Archives, as well as her worries about British activities in Northern Ireland becoming known to the general public.[64]

    Additional MI5 records relating to the blacklisting of government workers during Thatcher's time in office have also prompted questions after their release.[65] In addition to government workers, the blacklists also targeted other groups, such as unions and minorities, that may not fall in line with conservative policies.[66] Debates on the roles of MI5, Whitehall, and Thatcher's administration, have come up in light of these records at TNA and prompted questions of transparency as well as whether or not these blacklists had an effect on the careers of any individuals included.[65] Questions also remain, as ofwhether or not there are still blacklists currently in effect and if these could affect government workers, unions, and other individuals possibly included in the blacklists.[67]

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^The National Archives Annual Report (PDF), The National Archives, 15 Julyarchived(PDF) from the original on 17 Decemberretrieved 19 December
    2. ^"The National Archives". UK Government. Archived from the original on 14 September Retrieved 22 August
    3. ^"Machinery of Government changes: Data protection policy; Information Commissioner's Office; The National Archives; and, office professiona Archives, Government records management policy:Written statement – HCWS". Inside Government. storycall.us Archived from the original on 30 September Retrieved 12 October
    4. ^storycall.usived 29 November at the Wayback Machine.""The National Archives". Archived from the original on 25 January Retrieved 5 February ". Retrieved 22 August
    5. ^"Freedom of Information Act ". storycall.us. Archived from the original on 12 June Retrieved 15 June
    6. ^"Public Records Act ". storycall.us. Archived from the original on 18 May Retrieved 15 June
    7. ^"General Instructions: The Library". storycall.us. Archived from the original office professiona Archives 3 June Retrieved 15 June
    8. ^"Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Arts, Heritage and Office professiona Archives – storycall.us". storycall.us. Retrieved 29 March
    9. ^"The opening of the Public Record Office in Kew in ". Your Archives. The National Archives. Retrieved 5 July
    10. ^"Home". Deepstore. Archived from the original on 4 October Retrieved 1 February
    11. ^"New role for Chief Executive". The National Archives. Archived from the office professiona Archives on 5 September Retrieved 28 August
    12. ^"Appointment of Chief Executive and Keeper". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 5 September Retrieved 28 August
    13. ^"About Us, About us". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 9 May Retrieved office professiona Archives July
    14. ^"Public Records Act ". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 2 October Retrieved 26 May
    15. ^"HMC Warrant". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 12 June Retrieved 26 May
    16. ^Kingsley, Nick (). "Perspectives and Priorities: The National Archives Vision for Sector Leadership". Journal of the Society of Archivists. 33 (2): – doi/ S2CID&#;
    17. ^"Who we are, what we do and how we operate". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 12 July Retrieved 5 July
    18. ^"Visit us, Museum", office professiona Archives. The National Archives. Archived from the original on 26 May Retrieved 9 June
    19. ^"Detecting your browser settings". storycall.us Retrieved 1 February
    20. ^"Visit us, Why visit us?". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 10 July Retrieved 10 July
    21. ^"Visit us, Registering for a readers ticket". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 20 November Retrieved 10 July
    22. ^"Visit us, Ordering documents in advance". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 20 November Retrieved 10 July
    23. ^"Family Tree, Genealogy and Census Records". storycall.us Archived from the original on 12 November Retrieved 1 February
    24. ^"The National Archives, Discovery". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 20 May Retrieved 23 November
    25. ^"The National Archives, Licensed Internet Associates", office professiona Archives. The National Archives. Archived from the original on 30 October Retrieved 23 November
    26. ^"The National Archives, online records". The National Archives. Archived from the original on office professiona Archives October Retrieved 23 November
    27. ^"Education". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 2 February Retrieved 1 February
    28. ^Archives, The National. "Education – The National Archives". The National Archives. Retrieved 10 November
    29. ^Archives, The National. "Education – The National Archives". office professiona Archives National Archives. Retrieved 10 November
    30. ^"Access to Archives". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 2 February Retrieved 1 February
    31. ^"The National Archives – Access to Archives". Archived from the original on 8 July Retrieved 4 July
    32. ^"Archives Hub Steering Committee meeting, office professiona Archives, 1 NovemberUniversity of Manchester". Archives Hub. 1 November Archived from the original on 29 September Retrieved 5 July
    33. ^"A2A – Access to Archives home". Archived from the original on 28 July Retrieved 5 July
    34. ^"Discovery – The National Archives". storycall.us. Archived from the original Adobe XD Crack v42.0.22 & Key Full Version Free Download [2021] 4 August
    35. ^ abcdThe National Archives. "National Register of Archives". Archived from the original on 4 August Retrieved 5 July
    36. ^The National Archives. "National Register of Archives: Frequently asked questions". Archived from the original on 16 January Retrieved 20 January
    37. ^"Search Other Archives &#; Accessions to Repositories". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 2 February Retrieved 1 February
    38. ^"The National Archives – The ARCHON Directory". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 29 June Retrieved 5 July
    39. ^"Your Archives". storycall.us. Archived from the original on 17 August Retrieved 8 May
    40. ^The National Archives (14 May ). "Your Archives". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 7 June Retrieved 5 July
    41. ^"Your Archives". The National Archives. Retrieved 5 July
    42. ^"Your Archives: What can I contribute?", office professiona Archives. The National Archives. Retrieved 5 July
    43. ^"Catalogues and online records". The National Archives, office professiona Archives. Retrieved 1 February
    44. ^"migration". storycall.us Retrieved 1 February
    45. ^"Manorial Documents Register &#; Welcome". The National Archives. Archived from the original on 2 February Retrieved 1 February
    46. ^"The National Archives – Search the archives". Retrieved 4 July
    47. ^"The National Archives Hospital Records Database

      Welcome

      The Georgia Archives identifies, collects, provides access and preserves Georgia’s historical documents. Whether you love history, or simply want to know how we serve the citizens of Georgia, we invite you to explore office professiona Archives website or visit us in the City of Morrow, located just south of Atlanta. We look forward to serving you!

      We strongly encourage you to wear a face mask and socially distance at our facility.

      Please use our Ask an Archivist email reference service or call us at to inquire about office professiona Archives Georgia Archives will be closed Thursday, November 25th, office professiona Archives, Friday, November 26th, and Saturday, November 27th for the Thanksgiving Holiday.

      ANNOUNCEMENTS

      • Fourth Friday From the Archives

        Join us Friday, Office professiona Archives 3rd for our Virtual Event, &#;: The Georgia Archives: A Brief Overview and Update&#; presented by State Archivist and Assistant Vice Chancellor of office professiona Archives University System of Georgia Christopher Davidson. Meeting Link

      • From the Vaults

        New! Georgia Archives Newsletter, From the Vaults.

      • Virtual Fourth Friday Program & Program Schedule

        Lunch and Learn Lectures, Fourth Friday From the Archives, and Special Events

      LUNCH & LEARN LECTURES

      Lunch & Learn Virtual Lectures are Webinars hosted through Microsoft Teams, office professiona Archives. You may have to download the Microsoft Teams app.


      • December 10,
        A History of Christmas Traditions
        Andrew Bramlett, Student Historian
        Meeting Link
      Источник: [storycall.us]

    Office professiona Archives - remarkable

    Archives and Records Management Resources

    by T. R. Schellenberg

    Bulletins of the National Archives
    Number 8 (October )

    Footnotes

    Footnote 1 - Great Britain. Public Record Office, Principles governing the Elimination of Ephemeral or Unimportant Documents in Public or Private Archives (London, n.d.), p. 1. Return to Document Text

    Footnote 2 - Great Britain. P.R.O., Guide to the Public Records, Introductory (London, ), pt. 1, p. 6. See also Hilary Jenkinson, A Manual of Administration, p. 11 (2d ed., London, ). Return to Document Text

    Footnote 3 - The analysis of German appraisal standards is based on Wolfgang Leesch (ed.), Adolf Brenneke, Archivkunde: ein Beitrag zur Theorie und Geschichte des europaischen Archivwesens, p. (Leipzig, ). Return to Document Text

    Footnote 4 - Great Britain. P.R.O., Principles governing the Elimination . . ., p. Return to Document Text

    Footnote 5 - Paul Hasluck, "Problems of Research on Contemporary Official Records," Historical Studies: Australia and New Zealand, vol.5, No. 17, p. 5 (Nov). Return to Document Text

    Footnote 6 - C. E. W. Bean, "Australia's Federal Archives," ibid., vol. 3, No. 11, p. (Nov. ). Return to Document Text

    Footnote 7 - Leesch-Brenneke, Archivkunde, p Return to Document Text

    Footnote 8 - National Office of Vital Statistics, Vital Statistics in the United States, , (Washington, ). Return to Document Text

    Footnote 9 - Article on the "Torrens System," Encyclopedia Americana, (New York, Chicago, ). Return to Document Text

    Footnote 10 - P. J. Frederico, "Origin and Early History of Patents," Journal of the Patent Office Society, (July ). Return to Document Text

    Footnote 11 - P. J. Frederico, "Colonial Monopolies and Patents," ibid., (Aug. ). Return to Document Text

    Footnote 12 - Wallace B. Goebel. "Corporation Tax Returns," memorandum to Director, Records Management Division, Mar. 28, (MS. in National Archives). Return to Document Text

    Footnote 13 - W. J. Wilson, "Analysis of Government Records: An Emerging Profession," Library Quarterly, (Jan. ). Return to Document Text

    Footnote 14 - "Proceedings of the Second Annual Conference of Archivists," American Historical Association, Annual Report, , p. Return to Document Text

    Footnote 15 - Lyle J. Holverstott, "The General Accounting Office Accession: Its History and Significance," National Archives Accessions, No. 52 (Feb. ), p. Return to Document Text


    See Also:
    Источник: [storycall.us]

    home-page

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    Источник: [storycall.us]
    MI5 – The Security Service". storycall.us. Retrieved 25 November
  • ^Norton-Taylor, Richard (29 December ). "For their eyes only: the secret stories ministers don't want you to read

    Hi Spices,

    We're a nonprofit who recently migrated from Office Pro Plus to Office Standard, only to learn that Outlook Standard does not show our Online Archives.

    Upgrading to ProPlus isn't an option, so I've moved our Online Archives back into our mailboxes, into a folder named User_Archives.

    Problem is, that archive is now frozen in time.  

    If I want to enable archiving at the Tag level, my only option is to "move to the user's archive mailbox".  

    Should I just manually (or instruct my staff on how to) set up Outlook rules moving messages into their new archive?   Did I just answer my own question?  

    I'd love to hear what others have done after losing the ability to see their online archives.

    Thanks!

    Matthew


    Best Answer

    TechInTheCloud

    Jalapeno

    OP

    I think the answer liesin what you are trying to accomplish with the archive mailbox? There may be other ways to get to what you want. The common reasons that Office  customers use the archive mailbox that I see are:

    1. get over the 50GB limit with business premium: you get another 50GB in archive.

    2. Relieve Outlook caching load like on a remote desktop server: Outlook doesn't cache the archive mailbox

    If it isn't one of those, what is it? 

    It seems in your case, neither of those apply or at least you wouldn't gain anything by moving messages to yet another folder in Outlook. Why not just leave them where they are? A mailbox is a mailbox, to me moving messages to another folder based on some time element, means now I as a user have to look in 2 different places for that message I wanted to reference. It doesn't seem to serve any purpose, just invite confusion.

    I probably would have migrated the archive mailbox messages back to the regular mailboxes, into the same folders, one big mailbox that has everything, and call it a day.

    If you do really want to use archive mailbox, and it is truly an archive that the users don't need to reference often, you could have them use the Outlook Web App (i.e. storycall.uscom) which would show their archive mailbox.

    View this "Best Answer" in the replies below »

    6 Replies

    &#; &#; &#;

    TechInTheCloud

    Jalapeno

    OP

    Best Answer

    I think the answer liesin what you are trying to accomplish with the archive mailbox? There may be other ways to get to what you want. The common reasons that Office  customers use the archive mailbox that I see are:

    1. get over the 50GB limit with business premium: you get another 50GB in archive.

    2. Relieve Outlook caching load like on a remote desktop server: Outlook doesn't cache the archive mailbox

    If it isn't one of those, what is it? 

    It seems in your case, neither of those apply or at least you wouldn't gain anything by moving messages to yet another folder in Outlook. Why not just leave them where they are? A mailbox is a mailbox, to me moving messages to another folder based on some time element, means now I as a user have to look in 2 different places for that message I wanted to reference. It doesn't seem to serve any purpose, just invite confusion.

    I probably would have migrated the archive mailbox messages back to the regular mailboxes, into the same folders, one big mailbox that has everything, and call it a day.

    If you do really want to use archive mailbox, and it is truly an archive that the users don't need to reference often, you could have them use the Outlook Web App (i.e. storycall.uscom) which would show their archive mailbox.

    0

    &#; &#; &#;

    adrian_ych

    Mace

    OP

    Firstly, as non-profit, have you look at the costs from MS or Google instead of using corporate accounts ?

    0

    &#; &#; &#;

    TechInTheCloud

    Jalapeno

    OP

    Non-profit pricing is definitely worth looking at. Keep in mind, you need more than non-profit to qualify with MS, you have to have a "charitable mission". They also have education pricing if you fall under that umbrella.

    0

    &#; &#; &#;

    MappleB

    Anaheim

    OP

    Thanks for all of these questions!

    I think our reason for archiving is just efficiency/decluttering. Some of these mailboxes are over 15 years old; for my users with 30+GB, I think it's easier for them to see only the last two years in their mailbox, with everything else in their archive.

    If I could start over again, I would migrate the messages back to their original folders, rather than to an Archive folder within their mailbox. But the first two importing methods I tried did not completely work, so I wanted to make sure I could reverse the attempts when they failed.  Here was my struggle with that: storycall.us

    Most of our users did not have Online Archives enabled, so their mailboxes will just continue to accumulate and grow.   But for a group of my executives, they now have a folder named Archives, which is not actively receiving email that's over two years old.  I guess I'm wanting the archive function without paying for the archive function.

    We do get nonprofit pricing: Office Standard is $29, but Office Proplus is $

    And unfortunately, they want to keep using Outlook rather than the web app.

    Thanks again!
    Matthew

    0

    &#; &#; &#;

    TechInTheCloud

    Jalapeno

    OP

    For $3/user/month you can get non-profit Office Business Premium. Includes Office Business in which Outlook does support archive mailbox.

    It does seem you don't really have a need for archive mailbox, there is no need to declutter, It seems like a logical idea, and so did auto archiving to PST files back in the day. Just keep everything in one mailbox and there is never any confusion as to what messages are where. Mailbox size limits in O and Outlook's ability to deal with it grow faster than the mailboxes do. 

    0

    &#; &#; &#;

    MappleB

    Anaheim

    OP

    Thank you for your help.  I hadn't considered paid subscription as an option, but will include it.  Cheers.

    0

    This topic has been locked by an administrator and is no longer open for commenting.

    To continue this discussion, please ask a new question.

    Источник: [storycall.us]
    The National Archives Blog". The National Archives blog. Retrieved 18 November
  • ^Archives, The National. "Home – Archives Media Player". Archives Media Player. Retrieved 18 November
  • ^Archives, The National. "Archives inspire – The National Archives". storycall.us. Archived from the original on 9 December Retrieved 8 May
  • ^ abcdefghiFenton, Ben (3 May ). "Lies and secrets". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 6 May
  • ^ abFenton, Ben (3 May ). "Himmler forgeries in National Archives case will stay unsolved". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 6 May Retrieved 1 February
  • ^Holehouse, Matthew. "Hundreds of historic papers lost from National Archives". storycall.us. Retrieved 24 April
  • ^Cobain, Ian. "Government admits 'losing' thousands of papers from National Archives". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 April
  • ^Bateman, Tom. "More than government files missing from National Archives". BBC News. Retrieved 23 April
  • ^ ab"MI5 At The National Archives

    Summary

    An Archive folder has automatically been added to your Office mailbox. At the end of December , Office was updated to automatically create the Archive folder upon any access to the Exchange mailbox, initial or subsequent.

    Known issues

    Duplicate Archive1 folder

    You may get the duplicate folder Archive1 in addition to the Archive folder. If newly archived email is being moved to the Archive1 folder, follow these steps in Outlook and Outlook on the Web:

    1. Configure your email account to use Online Mode.

      • Click File, Account Settings, Account Settings .

      • In the Account Settings dialog box, click your email account on the Email tab, and then click Change.

      • Click to clear the Use Cached Exchange Mode checkbox, click Next, and then click Finish.

    2. Close and restart Outlook.

    3. After Outlook restarts, move all content to the folder that is currently designated as the default archive folder. In this case, it is the Archive1 folder.

    4. Delete the non-default folder named Archive .

    5. Close Outlook.

    6. Log into your Exchange Online mailbox via Outlook on the Web (storycall.us).

    7. In the Office portal, click the Settings cog, and under Your app settings, click the Mail option.

      • Make a note of where the Mail setting link is in this menu since later you will need to navigate back to it in a different language

    8. Click General, and then click Region and time zone. Change Language to something other than English.

      • Choose something easy to translate in case you can’t find your way back to these settings.

    9. Once you click Save to save the new language change, go back into email and notice the folders are all in the new language.

      • If you chose Español (Mexico), note the Archive1 folder name has been renamed to Archivo.

    10. Now, click on the Settings cog and navigate to the Mail options link under Your app settings again

      • Change the General, Regions and time zone, Language setting back to English (United States).

    11. Start Outlook and reset your email account to use Cached Exchange Mode.

    Archive folder in unexpected location

    You may find your Archive folder in an unexpected location, for example, as a subfolder of Deleted Items. To move the Archive folder to the default location, follow these steps in Outlook on the Web:

    1. Configure your email account to use Online Mode.

      • Click File, Account Settings, Account Settings .

      • In the Account Settings dialog box, click your email account on the Email tab, and then click Change.

      • Click to clear the Use Cached Exchange Mode checkbox, click Next, and then click Finish.

    2. Close and restart Outlook.

    3. After Outlook restarts, backup the content of the folder currently designated as the default archive folder. You can do this by creating a new folder and moving the email from the Archive folder to the new folder, or by exporting the Archive folder contents to an Outlook Data File (.pst).

    4. Close Outlook.

    5. Log into your Exchange Online mailbox via Outlook on the Web (storycall.us).

    6. Click the Mail tile.

    7. Navigate to the Archive folder that is in the unexpected location.

    8. Delete the Archive folder.
      Important Become familiar with steps as you must perform those steps immediately after this step.

    9. In the Office portal, click the Settings cog, and under Your app settings, click the Mail option.

      • Make a note of the location of the Mail setting link since you will later need to navigate back to it while the user interface is in a different language

    10. Click General, and then click Region and time zone. Change Language to something other than English.

      • Choose something easy to translate in case you can’t find your way back to these settings.

    11. Once you click Save to save the new language change, go back into email and notice the folders are all in the new language.

      • If you chose Español (Mexico), note the new folder Archivo has been created as a top level folder.

    12. Now, click on the Settings cog and navigate to the Mail options link under Your app settings again

      • Change the General, Regions and time zone, Language setting back to English (United States). This top level folder is renamed to Archive.

    13. Start Outlook and reset your email account to use Cached Exchange Mode.

    More Information

    The One Click Archive feature was available on the web version of Outlook in Office for more than a year before the Outlook user interface was updated to show the Archive button. If an Archive folder did not exist, clicking on the Archive button in Outlook would prompt you to create the Archive folder or select an existing folder as the target folder for One Click Archive. However, with the change documented here, the folder has since been created without a prompt or any other user interaction.

    For more information on the One-Click Archive feature in Outlook on the web, see New features coming to Outlook on the web.

    For more information on the One-Click Archive feature in Outlook , see Archive in Outlook for Windows.

    Источник: [storycall.us]

    Citing records in The National Archives

    Find out how to cite records and catalogues held by The National Archives.

    Precise and consistent citation helps to demonstrate that research work is based on documentary evidence. It is also crucial to allow other researchers to identify the source, verify information or take any initial research forward.

    Contents

    1. Overview
    2. Citing the institution
    3. Citing the catalogue (document) reference – single references
    4. Citing the catalogue (document) reference – multiple references
    5. Citing internal identifiers
    6. Citing a series title
    7. Citing web pages from our online catalogue
    8. Citing web pages from the UK Government Web Archive (UKGWA)
    9. Citing documents held elsewhere
    Copyright

    1. Overview

    A brief citation usually contains the following information:

    • name of the institution responsible for the custody of the records or catalogues – in this case, The National Archives
    • full catalogue reference (sometimes referred to as a document reference) – this is the alphanumeric code used to identify, describe and order the record
    • internal identifier – this might include details of the folio, page, docket, membrane or other number within the piece (the container box, volume, folio, bundle, roll and so on). File references provided by the government departments that created the records can be a key internal identifier for certain records. When available, the former file reference appears in The National Archives online catalogue under the label &#;Former references: in its original department&#;

    In some cases you may need to include the extended reference, that is the full series title, which may provide useful context information.

    Specific guidance on each of these points appears below, followed by advice on the citation of online catalogue page and a short note on copyright requirements.

    Please note: Discovery, The National Archives’ catalogue, has details of collections held by more than 2, archives across the UK. See section 4 for help on citing records not held by The National Archives.

    2. Citing the institution

    The National Archives was formerly known as the Public Record Office (PRO). You may, therefore, find variations in the way the institution is cited but we recommend excluding PRO from citations, as explained below.

    The National Archives

    The National Archives may be described or cited as:

    • The National Archives (TNA)
    • The National Archives of the UK (TNA)

    We recommend using a capital T on &#;The&#; when writing our name, whether or not it comes at the beginning of a sentence.

    The Public Record Office and the Historical Manuscripts Commission

    The Public Record Office has legal designation as a place of custody under the Public Records Acts of and The Historical Manuscripts Commission (HMC) has legal designation as an advisory body in the Royal Warrants of , and In long full citation, the name of the specific legal entity relevant to the documents to be cited used to follow the institutional name, separated by a colon, for example:

    • The National Archives (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO)
    • The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO)
    • The National Archives (TNA): Historical Manuscripts Commission (HMC)
    • The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Historical Manuscripts Commission (HMC)

    In subsequent citation, the abbreviated forms TNA: PRO and TNA: HMC were used.

    Since we no longer advise inserting the names &#;Public Record Office (PRO)&#; or &#;Historical Manuscripts Commission (HMC)&#; within the citation string because our name is now well established nationally and internationally. In long full citation one of the following will suffice:

    • The National Archives (TNA)
    • The National Archives of the UK (TNA)

    3. Citing the catalogue (document) reference – single references

    This consists of three parts (if the researcher opts for piece level citation) or four parts (when researchers cite a specific descriptive item within a container piece):

    Department code

    This should be set out exactly as it appears in The National Archives&#; online catalogue, Discovery. The department code consists of one or more capital letters with no punctuation. They represent the government department, agency or body that created the records. They can also identify the name of a holding, high level collection or fonds. For example:

    • C  (Chancery)
    • WO  (War Office)
    • ADM  (Admiralty)
    • MPB  (Maps and plans extracted to flat storage from records of the Exchequer)
    • GUK  (Records of storycall.us)

    Series number

    A series is a main grouping of records with a common origin and function or subject matter. A reference to a single complete series consists of department code, space, series number, as in the following examples:

    • ADM 22
    • C
    • MPAA 1
    • WO 32

    A few series codes contain two sets of numbers: a series number and a subnumber, separated by an oblique stroke. For example:

    • PRO 30/36
    • CP 25/2
    • IR /9

    Piece number

    A piece is not a single piece of paper; it may be a box, volume, file, roll and so on. The piece number should be set out as it appears in The National Archives online catalogue. It is usually a number but it may be a letter or a combination of number and letter. The piece reference is separated from the series code by an oblique stroke. For example:

    • JUST 1/46
    • SP 17/B
    • ASSI 34/57A

    In a few series, the piece number may consist of two or more sets of numbers, or letters and numbers. More complex piece numbers may include a regnal year, law term, diocese, or continent. Please cite these exactly as they appear on The National Archives&#; catalogue. For example:

    • E /6/46
    • E /25Eliz/Trin1
    • CO /MaltaandIonianIslands10a
    • CP 25/2//2GeoIIIMich
    • LAB 2/10

    Item number

    An item is a part of a piece. It can be a bundle, a single document, a file, a sub-file, a pouch, a range of folios and so on.

    An item can also be a unit of description listing names, places or other specific information contained within a piece. Traditionally, citation of our records was done at piece level (generally the unit of production at Kew). As itemisation has become common, in order to enhance the descriptions of our records and to enable digitisation, researchers may wish to cite an individual item within a piece.

    The use of other internal identifiers (such as former departmental references, folio or page numbers) is also possible, in order to enable the physical location of the relevant information within the record.

    The item part of a reference generally consists of one set of numbers, or letters and numbers after an oblique stroke. Born digital records may make further use of itemisation.

    • HO 42/15/1
    • HS 9/1/3
    • LAB 2/10/L/

    4. Citing the catalogue (document) reference – multiple references

    Multiple series

    A reference to a run of consecutive series should contain the full code of the first and last series, separated by a hyphen:

    A reference to two or more non-consecutive series should all be in full, separated by semi-colons:

    • ASSI 35; ASSI 45; ASSI 54

    Multiple pieces in a single series

    A reference to a run of consecutive pieces or items within a series should take one of two forms:

    When the first and last piece numbers differ only in the element following the final oblique stroke, there is no need to repeat all the elements; the document reference of the first piece should be given in full, followed by a hyphen and the final element of the last piece number:

    • MH 17/
    • E /25Eliz/Trin

    When the variation occurs in any element before the final oblique stroke, the complete document reference of both the first and last records should be given, separated by a hyphen:

    • ASSI 35/55/1 – ASSI 35/58/2

    A reference to two or more non-consecutive records in the same series should be treated in the same way. When the piece or item numbers differ only in the element following the final oblique stroke, the catalogue reference of the first record should be given in full, followed by the final element of the remaining records, separated from each other by a comma:

    However, when the variation occurs before the final oblique stroke, the full catalogue reference of each piece should be given, separated by a semi-colon:

    • ASSI 35/55/1; ASSI 35/56/2

    Multiple items within a piece

    The general principles above regarding format, non-consecutive references and punctuation remain the same and should apply for the citation of specific items. Always refer to a whole piece instead of a complete run of all the items within it. For example, cite INF 9/ instead of INF 9// when the citation refers to all the 28 photographs for a particular place (the container piece description).

    Citation of runs of items should only be used to identify parts of a piece:

    The above sequence identifies the letters of a particular captain within a piece which contains correspondence for surnames starting with a letter of the alphabet.

    5. Citing internal identifiers

    A reference to an internal part of a document not referenced in The National Archives&#; catalogue can take a variety of forms but should always be separated from the catalogue reference by a comma, not by an oblique stroke. They may be written in full (for example: page, folios, membrane).

    The following abbreviations may be used, without punctuation and not italicised:

    • p or pp for page or pages
    • f or ff for folio or folios
    • no or nos for number or numbers
    • m or mm for membrane or membranes (used only for chancery-style rolls – those sewn head to foot, and for parchment membranes of files)
    • rot or rots for rotulus or rotuli (used only for exchequer-style rolls – those sewn together at the head)
    • col or cols for column or columns

    The abbreviation will usually be followed by a number or a letter. Numbers are written as Arabic numerals with one exception: if a document (for example, a printed report) contains two sequences of internal numbering, one with roman numerals and the other with Arabic numerals, small roman numerals should be used for the former:

    When the reference is to the piece of parchment rather than to its contents, the number of the folio or membrane is enough. However, when the reference is to the contents, it may be necessary to be more specific. After the folio, rotulus or membrane number, researchers may add the following letters: &#;r&#; (for the recto of a folio or rotulus), &#;v&#; (for the verso of a folio or rotulus) or &#;d&#; (for the dorse of a membrane). If no &#;d&#; is given after the membrane number, it is implied that the number refers to the face.

    After letters or small roman numerals the words recto, verso and dorse should be written in full instead of the abbreviations, to prevent ambiguity. The number should be repeated when the matter referred to begins on one side and continues onto the other:

    • C 66/76 m 21d
    • SP 52/40, f 21r
    • JUST 1/, rot 4r-4v
    • E /3, rot F verso
    • SP 52/64, f xvi recto-xvi verso

    If there is no internal numbering or former file or department numbering, the internal reference should consist of the briefest description that allows ready identification of the part being cited, such as a date, or a date and the names of the correspondents. Dates should be set out in the order day, month, year but should otherwise be given as in the document. For example:

    • PRO 1/3, 25 June Workmen to Palgrave
    • T 1/, paper /33
    • CO 23/, gov of 3 Sept
    • FO /, file , paper 32
    • WO /, 68/Gen/
    • FO /15, docket no

    The principles outlined above for runs of pieces and items should be followed for runs of pages or membranes.

    • CO 5/, pp
    • JUST 1/, rots 4rv

    Non-consecutive pages should be expressed as follows:

    • CO 5/, pp , ,
    • JUST 1/, rots 1r, 2v, 4r

    A run of almost continuous numbers can be written in the same way as consecutive numbers, with the addition of the word &#;passim&#;:

    • CO 5/, pp passim

    If there are conflicting sequences of numbers on the folios or membranes, and it is not obvious which numeration should be chosen, consult a member of staff at The National Archives. The numeration chosen should be indicated briefly in a list of abbreviations or within square brackets immediately after the number when the document is first cited.

    • JUST 1/, rot 1 [orig nos] schedule 1r

    6. Citing a series title

    When a series reference is used for citation in any work, a definition in words of that series code should appear in that work. The full series title may appear in a prefatory list of abbreviations, in a bibliography or in the footnote where the series is first cited. The words should be the series title exactly as it appears in the catalogue:

    • C Chancery: Inquisitions Post Mortem, Series I, Henry VI
    • PREM 9 Prime Minister&#;s Office: Reports on the Efficiency of the Civil Service by Sir Derek Rayner
    • HO Identity and Passport Service Website

    Examples of full citation:

    • The National Archives (TNA): WO 32
    • The National Archives of the UK (TNA): JUST 1/40
    • The National Archives of the UK (TNA): ADM 1//19
    • The National Archives (TNA): C Chancery: Inquisitions Post Mortem, Series 1, Henry VI

    Thereafter:

    • TNA: WO 32
    • TNA: JUST 1/40
    • TNA: ADM 1//19
    • TNA: C Chancery: Inquisitions Post Mortem, Series 1, Henry VI

    7. Citing web pages from our online catalogue

    Citation of online catalogue web pages should include the following elements:

    1. The name of the website: The National Archives website
    2. The name of the part of the website, clearly identified using plain English and separated from the previous element by a colon: Discovery
    3. The catalogue reference (separated from the previous element by a colon): WARD
    4. The title from the title field within the descriptive catalogue entry or in its absence the description field. In a minority of cases descriptions can be quite lengthy, in which case the first phrase or sentence should be used (as necessary) to aid understanding. A comma should be placed at the end of this element: Records of the Court of Wards and Liveries,
    5. An internal reference such as a folio number may be used to aid identification within the web page when descriptions are very long. (See the example below for ADM //1)
    6. The covering dates from the descriptive catalogue entry followed by a comma: c,
    7. You may wish to add the name of the field (label) where the information comes from. For example: Administrative/biographical background or Description or Custodial history
    8. The uri (url), which in the case of Discovery pages contains the unique database identifier or information asset id, preceded by the words &#;available at&#;: available at storycall.us?uri=C
    9. The precise date when the information was accessed and taken from The National Archives website, expressing  the day in numbers, the name of the month in full and four digits for the calendar year: (accessed 24 July )

    Examples of The National Archives website citation

    The National Archives Website: Discovery: WARD Records of the Court of Wards and Liveries, c, Administrative/biographical background available at  storycall.us?uri=C (accessed 24 July )

    The National Archives Website: Discovery: DEFE Division 3 Communications and Intelligence Records, , Administrative/biographical background available at storycall.us?uri=C (accessed 10 September )

    The National Archives Website: Discovery: STAC 8 Court of Star Chamber: Proceedings, James I, cc, Description available at storycall.us?uri=C (accessed 4 September )

    The National Archives Website: Discovery: ADM //1 Medical journal of HMS Formidable, ff , , Description available at storycall.us?uri=C (accessed 24 July )

    The National Archives Website: Discovery: PROB 11/4/1 Will of Thomas Aleyn, Leather seller of London, 9 August , Description available at storycall.us?uri=D (accessed 1 July )

    8. Citing web pages from the UK Government Web Archive (UKGWA)

    Citation of web pages preserved within the UK Government Web Archive (UKGWA) should include the following elements:

    1. The name of the publication/document and/or its author, if this is appropriate (i.e. if you are referring to a publication, speech or other particular text within the UKWGA, rather than just an archived web page), for instance: ‘Pigs Are Still Worth It – Open letter for the Trade Press from NPA (National Pig Association)’
    2. The name of the website, for instance: British Pig Executive Website
    3. The name of the part of the website, clearly identified using plain English and separated from the previous element by a colon, for instance: Document Store
    4. The date the document or web page was originally published
    5. The date that that page of the website was archived by the UKGWA, as shown in the red banner at the top of UKGWA web pages, or in the ‘timestamp’ of the uri (i.e., ‘’ or 4 March )
    6. The uri (url) including the //webarchive extension and the timestamp identifying exactly when the web page was archived, preceded by the words Retrieved from the UK Government Web Archive: storycall.us&#;
    7. The precise date when the information was accessed and taken, expressing the day in numbers, the name of the month in full and four digits for the calendar year: (accessed 12 July )

    Examples of UKGWA citation

    ‘Pigs Are Still Worth It – Open letter for the Trade Press from NPA (National Pig Association)’, British Pig Executive Website: Document Store, published 1 October , version archived on 4 March Retrieved from the UK Government Web Archive: storycall.us&#; (accessed 12 July )

    ‘Speech by Rt. Hon Gordon Brown MP, Chancellor of the Exchequer – Launch of The New Deal, Tayside Pathfinder – 5th January ’, HM Treasury Website: Statements and Speeches: Chancellor’s Speeches, published 5 January , version archived on 29 January Retrieved from the UK Government Web Archive: storycall.us&#; (accessed 13 June )

    Bank of England, ‘News Release: Y2K: Longer-term repos by the Bank of England’, Bank of England Website: Publications: News: , published 20 September , version archived 12 November Retrieved from the UK Government Web Archive: storycall.us&#; (accessed 24 June )

    9. Citing documents held elsewhere

    Discovery, The National Archives’ catalogue also has details of collections held by over archives across the UK. For example, it includes content from the National Register of Archives (NRA) and the Manorial Document Register.

    Numbered lists and entries of the National Register of Archives (NRA) and catalogue references from resources in archives elsewhere may be cited as follows:

    Lists and catalogue entries from the NRA

    • The National Archives (TNA): NRA

    Hereafter:

    Lists and catalogue entries from the Manorial Documents Register (MDR)

    The National Archives (TNA): MDR GB/NNAF/M

    Hereafter:

    Catalogue entries in Discovery for records not held by The National Archives:

    Citation of records held elsewhere, whose descriptions appear in Discovery, should follow the guidance available from the institution responsible for the custody of the records. These references should not include the name of The National Archives (TNA). In the absence of guidance from the holding institution, citation may follow this format:

    • Name of repository: Repository reference

    Citation of our online catalogue entry for those records should follow the section of this document for &#;Citing online catalogue web pages&#;.

    Copyright

    Most records held by The National Archives are in copyright, which imposes restrictions on the extent to which they may be quoted, published in full or reproduced in facsimile without permission from the copyright owner. More information is available on our Copyright web pages.

    Источник: [storycall.us]
    office professiona Archives

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